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Forests of Belonging: Identities, Ethnicities, and Stereotypes in the Congo River Basin (Culture, Place, and Nature) epub ebook

by Stephanie Karin Rupp

Forests of Belonging: Identities, Ethnicities, and Stereotypes in the Congo River Basin (Culture, Place, and Nature) epub ebook

Author: Stephanie Karin Rupp
Category: Africa
Language: English
Publisher: University of Washington Press (July 26, 2011)
Pages: 304 pages
ISBN: 0295991062
ISBN13: 978-0295991061
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 584
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Forests of Belonging book. Forests of Belonging examines the history and ongoing transformation.

Forests of Belonging book. Culture, Place, and Nature: Studies in Anthropology and Environment (1 - 10 of 13 books). Books by Stephanie Rupp.

Culture, Place, and Nature: Studies in Anthropology and Environment. Stephanie Karin Rupp.

Forests of Belonging: Identities, Ethnicities, and Stereotypes in the Congo River Basin. Forests of Belonging" examines the history and ongoing transformation of ethnic and social relationships among four distinct, Baka, Bakwele, and Mbomam-in the Lobeke forest region of southeastern Cameroon. Culture, Place, and Nature: Studies in Anthropology and Environment. University of Washington Press.

Series Culture, Place, and Nature. Social Identities, Ethnic Affiliations, and Stereotypes. Forests of Belonging. Identities, Ethnicities, and Stereotypes in the Congo River Basin. Introduction: Forests of Belonging 1. Paradigms: The Forest and Its People 2. Belonging: Ethnic Affiliations and Confluences 3. Spaces: Beyond Nature and Culture 4. Ambiguities: Interethnic Marriage and Descent 5. Tangles: Parallel Clans, Alliances, Rituals, and Collective Work 6. Identities: People in Changing Contexts 7. Contradictions: Identities, Opportunities, and Conflicts Conclusion: Rethinking. Notes Glossary of Non-English Terms Bibliography Index.

Forests of Belonging examines the history and ongoing transformation of ethnic and social relationships among four distinct, Baka, Bakwele, and Mbomam-in the Lobeke forest region of southeastern Cameroon. previous analyses of social relationships in tropical forests have resulted in binary frameworks that render real-life relationships invisible and that have perpetuated correspondingly misleading labels, such as "pygmy. In the absence of direct evidence, an imagined cut hunter stands in for the index patient of pandemic HIV/AIDS. word Introduction: Forests of Belonging1. Paradigms: The Forest and Its People2. Belonging: Ethnic Affiliations and Confluences3. Spaces: Beyond Nature and Culture4. During the early years of colonial rule, this explanation goes, a hunter was cut o. More). Rethinking Human–Nonhuman Primate Contact and Pathogenic Disease Spillover.

Grinker, Roy Richard.

Published by: University of Washington Press. Series: Culture, Place, and Nature. 2. Belonging: Ethnic Affiliations and Confluences. Download. 3. Spaces: Beyond Nature and Culture. 4. Ambiguities: Interethnic Marriage and Descent. 5. Tangles: Parallel Clans, Alliances, Rituals, and Collective Work. 6. Identities: People in Changing Contexts. 7. Contradictions: Identities, Opportunities, and Conflicts.

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Rupp, Stephanie. Group identity Cameroon. Group identity Congo River Valley. Series: Culture, Place, and Nature Ser. Subjects: Group identity Cameroon. Stereotypes (Social psychology) Cameroon. Stereotypes (Social psychology) Congo River Valley. Ethnicity Cameroon. Ethnicity Congo River Valley. Cameroon Ethnic relations.

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Forests of Belonging examines the history and ongoing transformation of ethnic and social relationships among four distinct communities--Bangando, Baka, Bakwéle, and Mbomam--in the Lobéké forest region of southeastern Cameroon. By slotting forest communities into ecological categories such as "hunters" and "gatherers," previous analyses of social relationships in tropical forests have resulted in binary frameworks that render real-life relationships invisible and that have perpetuated correspondingly misleading labels, such as "pygmy." Through rich descriptive detail resulting from field work among the Bangando, Stephanie Rupp illustrates the complexity of social ties among groups and individuals, and their connections with the natural world. She demonstrates that social and ethno-ecological relations in equatorial African forests are nuanced, contested, and shifting, and that the intricacy of these links must be considered in the design and implementation of aid policies and strategies for conservation and development.
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