ePub 1458 kb. | Fb2 1110 kb. | DJVU: 1344 kb.
Fiction, Literature

The Third Brother: A Novel epub ebook

by Nick McDonell

The Third Brother: A Novel epub ebook

Author: Nick McDonell
Category: United States
Language: English
Publisher: Grove Press (April 10, 2006)
Pages: 280 pages
ISBN: 0802142672
ISBN13: 978-0802142672
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 555
Other formats: docx lrf lrf azw


Nick McDonell's debut novel, Twelve, was a publishing sensation. It was an international best seller and established its seventeen-year-old author as an important literary voice. In The Third Brother.

Nick McDonell's debut novel, Twelve, was a publishing sensation.

Nick McDonell's "Twelve" created a sensation around the world, establishing its seventeen-year-old author as one of the new and important voices of his generation. The Third Brother" is his highly anticipated second novel. Nick McDonell's "Twelve" created a sensation around the world, establishing its seventeen-year-old author as one of the new and important voices of his generation. In The Third Brother, McDonell delivers another remarkable novel, a haunting tale of brotherly love, family tragedy, and national grief

Nick McDonell's debut novel, Twelve, was a publishing sensation. In The Third Brother, McDonell delivers another remarkable novel, a haunting tale of brotherly love, family tragedy, and national grief. Mike was a lucky child: a vacation house on Long Island, famous family friends, an Ivy League education, and also an older brother, Lyle, who looked out for him. It's 2001, and Mike is a summer intern at a magazine in Hong Kong. Sent on assignment to Bangkok, Mike finds the.

Nick McDonell's first book, Twelve, written when he was 17, was a minimalist, filmic novel about wealthy and anomic . Lyle is the fire's only survivor, and, in his state of shocked trauma, fabricates a third brother, an evil brother who is responsible for the death of his parents.

Nick McDonell's first book, Twelve, written when he was 17, was a minimalist, filmic novel about wealthy and anomic New York teenagers. The effect was a terse, empty repetition of an empty story that both writer and reader had already seen and heard. It was good in a way that you couldn't articulate without unpicking an irony within an irony. At last the careful dislocation in Mike's family puts its true, battered face into the light.

The Third Brother book. In The Third Brother, McDonell delivers another remarkable novel, a haunting tale of brotherly love, family tragedy, and national grief

The Third Brother book. Nick McDonell's debut novel, Twelve, was a publishing sensation. Mike was a lucky child: a vacation house on Long Island, fam Nick McDonell's debut novel, Twelve, was a publishing sensation.

McDonell wrote the novel Twelve in 2002, when he was very young at 17. The subject of the novel is disaffection . ISBN 0-8021-1802-X), was released in September 2005. The subject of the novel is disaffection, despair, drug use and violence among a group of wealthy Manhattan teenagers during Winter break. The publication of the novel at such a young age was the subject of many articles in high-profile publications such The New Yorker and Entertainment Weekly. The New York Times called it "a haunting tale of brotherly love.

The hype is all true' Sunday TelegraphNick McDonell's electrifying novel tells the story of a fictional drug called Twelve and its devastating effects on the beautiful rich and desperate poor of New York City. From page one, this novel pulsates towards its apocalyptic climax. Twelve is cool, cruel and utterly compulsive.

Twelve is a 2002 novel by Nick McDonell about drug addiction, violence and sex among mainly wealthy Manhattan teenagers. The title refers to a new designer drug. The drug is referred to as a cross between cocaine and ecstasy

Twelve is a 2002 novel by Nick McDonell about drug addiction, violence and sex among mainly wealthy Manhattan teenagers. The drug is referred to as a cross between cocaine and ecstasy. While Twelve follows the lives of a number of wealthy young adults, it centres on that of 17-year-old drug-dealer White Mike. White Mike: Philosophical 17-year-old drug dealer who roams the streets of New York, peddling marijuana to rich teens.

Read Brother all chapters online for free. Lightweight and mobile compatible. This story also stands out among BL novels in that it explores China in the 80s in great depth, as our protagonists live through major events in the country at that time. There will be explicit content between the brothers, so I warn those against incest to stop here and save yourselves the anguish.

Nick McDonell's 2002 debut, Twelve, was a small . Nick McDonell's 2002 debut, Twelve, was a small lesson in stylistic restraint. The book's last part finds Mike back in 9/11-stricken NYC, tending to his disturbed brother, Lyle, in the aftermath of a family crisis

Nick McDonell's 2002 debut, Twelve, was a small lesson in stylistic restraint. That, though, was not the big news attendant upon its publication. The book's last part finds Mike back in 9/11-stricken NYC, tending to his disturbed brother, Lyle, in the aftermath of a family crisis. The novel has weaknesses; the section's major plot turn, in particular, seems ill-conceived. Nevertheless, its depiction of a young man embracing the accommodations that come with adult existence is captivating.

Nick McDonell's debut novel, Twelve, was a publishing sensation. It was an international best seller and established its seventeen-year-old author as an important literary voice. In The Third Brother, McDonell delivers another remarkable novel, a haunting tale of brotherly love, family tragedy, and national grief.Mike was a lucky child: a vacation house on Long Island, famous family friends, an Ivy League education, and also an older brother, Lyle, who looked out for him. It's 2001, and Mike is a summer intern at a magazine in Hong Kong. Sent on assignment to Bangkok, Mike finds the city electric with violence and hedonism. Nothing goes according to plan. When terrible news about his brother arrives from home, Mike rushes back to the States. Lyle is unstable and suffering from visions of an imaginary third brother. And then, a clear September morning is broken by catastrophe. While the Twin Towers burn, Mike makes an epic trek through the ghostly streets of New York to find and save Lyle. From Patpong to the World Trade Center to Harvard Yard, as his life and country come apart, Mike struggles to find his footing and go on. The joke, it turns out, is on him.
Reviews (7)
Mildorah
Thanks

Chuynopana
I think Nick McDonell is an young and important voice in new American teen lit. And his talent has developed over the 5 or six years since "Twelve," which, if I were teaching h.s. English, I'd assign. Can't wait for his next work.

Hellmaster
McDonell's first novel "Twelve" was effective because although it wasn't beautifully written (and it did have moments of this), the book's style served its purpose well. In other words, the shallow characters and short chapters helped us understand these disillusioned characters a bit better and weirdly enriched the book. Bret Easton Ellis did this (fast pacing, shallow characters) before McDonell in both "Less Than Zero" and "The Rules of Attraction", but McDonell made his book unique and exciting.

"The Third Brother" is certainly not difficult to read. It is not a tedious piece of modern "literary" fiction. It is written in much the same style as "Twelve." The problem with this is that given the characters and action of "The Third Brother," short chapters make no sense. McDonell needs to garner the confidence to let his characters have depth and complexity. He needs to allow for longer dialogues, scenes, and chapters. There is nothing inherently wrong with short chapters and basic characterizations in fiction, but 21st-century expatriate journalists and intelligent post-adolescents, as nihilistic or hedonistic as they may be, aren't best portrayed like this.

As has been mentioned in reviews not on Amazon, McDonell's three-piece narrative is also weak and again smacks of a lack of confidence in his ability to maintain a good story.

McDonell nonetheless has a lot of talent and the potential to do well -- or at least much, much better than this second effort.

Matty
Young and passionate authors, celebrated for their raw and fiery prose, are often allowed to get away with less-than-skillful technique, hole-ridden plots, unrealistic characters and messy dialogue. Authors whose first books are published before they can legally drink are lauded (and rightly so) just for being so good at such a young age. With the publication of their subsequent works comes the questions of whether they can transcend their youthful literary style, whether their style and technique has matured, whether they have a viable literary voice, and whether their fame and recognition was solely reliant on their youth.

With the publication of his second novel, THE THIRD BROTHER, Nick McDonell faces just such a test. His debut work of fiction, TWELVE, which was hailed as "fast...relentless" and "a beautifully tragic and unsettling story," launched the then-17-year-old author headlong into a kind of literary celebrity that recalled the reception of LESS THAN ZERO by Bret Easton Ellis in 1985. In both cases, the praise of the novel was inextricably bound up in the youth and youthful voice of its author. Ellis managed to outgrow that initial swoop of fame and prove to be more than just a transient literary fad. With THE THIRD BROTHER, McDonell shows promise enough to follow in Ellis's footsteps and establish himself as something more than just a 17-year-old flash in the pan.

The novel begins with blue-blooded, Harvard-educated Mike's forays into the drug-addled hippie hangouts of Bangkok, Thailand, where he is on assignment for his internship in Hong Kong. Ostensibly there to infiltrate the scene, he also has been sent by his boss --- his father's ex-Harvard chum --- to undertake the task of tracking down an old roommate, a close friend and an ex-reporter named Christopher Dorr, whose history with Mike's father and their close-knit circle of college friends is thorny and convoluted. Dorr had gone to Bangkok to research a story and never returned, dissipating into a sultry and debauched world.

What Mike discovers in Thailand --- about his father, about Dorr, and about himself --- is enough to throw his once-stable conception of identity, of family, and of good versus evil completely off-kilter. And Mike's struggle with, and final acceptance of, the closest truth he can find is well-depicted. We see the initial Mike, a serious but coddled young man who is accustomed to easy answers, face ugly truths about human nature and human instinct. We see those truths change him, but in a way that is natural and steady, and never forced.

When we meet up again with Mike, his parents have died in a fire, the work of his always-troubled older brother Lyle. Lyle has descended into a kind of madness, and Mike has transferred to Columbia to look after him. Mike and Lyle's story begins and ends on September 11, 2001. Any writer who attempts to make use of that day in their work faces the inevitable allegations of literary manipulation --- of attempting to milk an instant so full of national pathos that the author can lazily fall back on the emotions it induces in readers and imagines there is no need to create any with his or her words.

Yet McDonell evades this accusation simply by presenting Mike's life as relatively gloomy even before the first plane hits. The collapse of the towers, the chaos in downtown New York, and the panicked, nervy journey that Mike makes downtown to see his brother are all written at a kind of frantic pace. McDonell captures the breathless fear, the seeming absurdity and need for movement --- for action of any kind --- that that day invoked. As the novel propels itself to a climactic finale, the delusions of Lyle echo the madness of the world, made suddenly very real to a once-sheltered nation. And the capacity for evil that America suddenly must bear witness to echoes Mike's own revelatory experience in Thailand.

The novel is divided into three sections. The first, in Thailand, takes place over about a week. The second, in New York City, details the events of just one day. The third takes place a year later and darkly presents the consequences of the first two. All three are made up of quick --- often less than three-paged --- chapters. All are interspersed with a series of flashbacks to Mike's childhood and the events that culminate in his parents' deaths. Thus, THE THIRD BROTHER is rather technically complex --- asking the reader to travel with Mike's subconscious back and forth in time, to jump from the laconic heat of Thailand to the rapid-fire events of September 11th and beyond, and yet to still remain engaged. McDonell succeeds in holding his reader to the potentially unwieldy story with his uncanny ability to render scenes and places with simple language and direct sentences.

It is in describing a very specific scene --- a backyard in the slums of Bangkok, or the 24-hour bar of a sleazy hotel --- that McDonell proves his staying power. His skill lies in his very real ability to bring his reader into the world on the page. It is to McDonell's credit that he doesn't try to infuse his prose with flowery descriptions and complicated sentences; it bespeaks a kind of self-assurance that, for a 21-year-old, is both unsurprisingly age-appropriate and surprisingly earned. He is a talented writer who will keep getting better --- and luckily we are along for the ride.

--- Reviewed by Jennifer Krieger

Shaktizragore
My girlfriend bought this book for me for Christmas so I felt obligated to read it. After reading it I am seriously contemplating breaking up with her.

The only positive thing about the book is that it's a quick read, mainly because it is at a 7th grade reading level. Little Johnny might like this one while his mom is driving him to soccer practice.

The story is weak and fragmented. There is no character development. You get the feeling the author is writing about situations that he has no clue about. For instance, the whole first part of the story takes place in Thailand where Mike is trying to hunt down one of his boss' old college buddies. Mike is supposed to infiltrate the backpacking, drug using scene around Thailand to find him. However, you get the feeling the author might've watched the travel channel once and thinks having a few Mountain Dew's is his idea of a wild time. Mike makes Thailand seem like Kansas in a feeble effort to spice things up. I have already wasted too much time writing about the book and I have not even said anything (much like the book). This book seems forced, Just stay away from it.

SadLendy
I have nothing positive to say about this book except that I got it from the library so did not waste any money on it. This is a classic example of a particular type of drivel that gets hyped because its about the Manhattan elite who control the publishing world. Should be burned.

Zodama
Like many others, I was quickly sucked in to the first part of Nick McDonell's sophomore effort (after reading and completely enjoying Twelve). Knowing what awaited me in the second part, and having lived through 9/11 myself as a NYC resident in 2001, I had great hopes for what lay ahead. But for me, the entire plot quickly short circuited,leaving literary fragments in its wake. By the end, I was asking myself why his editor hadn't done a better job.

I look forward to the next effort. He shows great promise; it wasn't close to being fulfilled with this book.

First off, I thought Twelve was a sensational novel and promised a great career for the author. But this? Not only was it not a novel, but it was barely even an idea. Poorly written, poorly paced and poorly edited. How did this get published??

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved