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Fiction, Literature

Golem Song epub ebook

by Marc Estrin

Golem Song epub ebook

Author: Marc Estrin
Category: United States
Language: English
Publisher: Unbridled Books; First Edition edition (November 1, 2006)
Pages: 320 pages
ISBN: 1932961232
ISBN13: 978-1932961232
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 733
Other formats: azw doc mobi lrf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. By some incalculable force of human attraction, Alan Krieger has two lovers. A man of his girth and compulsion. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Recalling the folktale of the Golem-the Frankensteinian giant of clay that saved the Jews in 16th Century Prague-Alan lays out a plan of attack and then .

Recalling the folktale of the Golem-the Frankensteinian giant of clay that saved the Jews in 16th Century Prague-Alan lays out a plan of attack and then sets to making the most outrageous of preparations in the culture wars, in New York City at the turn of the millennium. Like each of the acclaimed Estrin novels that have preceded it, Golem. Song is an allusive, manic, and wildly comic approach to some of the most serious and difficult cultural questions of our time.

Popular American Fiction, Fiction, Fiction - General, General, Fiction, General, New York City, Golem, Paranoia. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on March 21, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Marc Estrin is the author of the highly praised novels Insect Dreams and The Education of Arnold Hitler. Both of these books cast an unlikely character in the midst of the twentieth century: the first novel’s protagonist Gregor Samsa in the first half and Arnold Hitler, the second novel’s anti-hero, in the second half. His newest novel, Golem Song, is the story of an angry Jewish man who identifies with the bellicosity of Israel - the Israel of the Old Testament and the Israel of today - while laughing at himself and the world he blusters through.

Golem Song, Unbridled Books, 2006.

Marc Estrin (born April 20, 1939) is an American writer and political activist. 1 Early life and education. Estrin said that the concept, an outline and the opening episodes of Insect Dreams arrived in Vermont one morning at 3 AM, three weeks after he visited Kafka's grave. Insect Dreams appeared from BlueHen/Putnam in 2002. Since then it has been re-released (by Unbridled Books). Golem Song, Unbridled Books, 2006. The Lamentations of Julius Marantz, Unbridled Books, 2007.

Written by Marc Estrin, narrated by Marc Estrin. Golem Song is such a wonderful book because it challenges the reader's assumptions and way of thinking about people and their minds. One can't help but develop a love/hate relationship with Alan Krieger. Love him because of his wit; hate him for who he i. (Vermont Today) "Estrin's abrasive antihero's commitment to battling false messiahs is morbidly compelling, and his logorrhea is occasionally dazzling. and tinkers with the story of the golem, his mind-bending humor is at once intellectual and ribald.

Golem Song wears its Joycean ambitions on its sleeve, beginning with an homage to Ulysses: "Stately? No. Ahh, but plump?

Golem Song at Harvard intro.

Golem Song at Harvard intro.

Golem Song by Estrin, Marc and Publisher Unbridled Books. Canadian customers may purchase from our stores in Canada or the US. Canada. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781936071944, 1936071940. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781932961232, 1932961232.

Unbridled Books, 2006. No outside force creates this golem. Estrin’s protagonist, Alan Krieger, makes his golem out of nothing more than his very own self. Alan, a registered nurse who sees himself as a healer to all the world, is a passionate Jew, a confirmed bigot and a character as wildly original as they come. It is his self-appointed mission to rescue the Jews of New York from his perceived menace, the black inhabitants of the city. Alan is larger than life, figuratively and literally. A huge man with huge appetites, he is brilliant, creative and multi-talented.

By some incalculable force of human attraction, Alan Krieger has two lovers.A man of his girth and compulsion, a man who cannot stop talking and who believes the world to be completely irrational, should not take one companion for granted, much less two. Women who can tolerate his anger, his obsessions, and his antic clowning all at the same time are not easy to come by.But when the thought arises in Alan that he’s been “chosen” to deliver Jewish America from the threat of Anti-Semitism, then all his connections to reality fall away, including those to his lovers and his family. Recalling the folktale of the Golem—the Frankensteinian giant of clay that saved the Jews in 16th Century Prague—Alan lays out a plan of attack and then sets to making the most outrageous of preparations in the culture wars, in New York City at the turn of the millennium.Like each of the acclaimed Estrin novels that have preceded it, Golem Song is an allusive, manic, and wildly comic approach to some of the most serious and difficult cultural questions of our time.
Reviews (2)
Zeueli
Marc Estrin is, above all, a riveting story teller, of the sort to whom children at a campfire would each want to sit closest. I am now reading Golem Song for the third time, with a couple of years gap separating each reading. The first read was a fun "ride" on a fast-moving, witty, erudite but not stuffy book I hated to see the end of. The second time I read it a little more more carefully, and was impressed with its scope and display of a sweeping knowledge of culture and literature.This time I am reading it even more slowly and with a different kind of attention, and am not just knocked out by the staggering intellectual, philosophical, historical, spiritual, psychological and sociological underpinnings of this work and the questions it raises while still managing to entertain the reader, but also moved by its sensitivity and tenderness. It has a subtly holistic structure, in which the author engages, entrances and dazzles us in a way which echoes and amplifies the personality of his main character. And it is really funny.
Estrin plumbs and displays the mind of a profoundly unattractive character, Alan Krieger: a racist, chauvinistic, hateful, brilliant, manic, highly skilled and quite disagreeable individual, whom we literally inhabit during this novel, experiencing from his innards the behavior and viewpoints which, were we merely witnesses, we would only find abhorrent. Instead, because Alan is so real and layered, and has a quick and very associative if peculiar intellect, we almost become the person he is as we enter the world of this tale. His tribal hatred of all others, and the centrality of this hatred to a cobbled-together identity, constantly on the brink of disintegration, speaks to the xenophobia which has driven the atrocities of the past hundred years and more; in getting us to feel it from such an intimate vantage point, Estrin leads us to a powerful confrontation with our own loyalties and hatreds, which therefore provides us with an opportunity to reconsider.
As a pure piece of literature, it is lyrical and very beautiful. Its tone is modern and rhythmic - enough that hip-hop artists could chant whole chapters to their accompanying beats with good effect, yet has a folksy, conversational feel that makes it a pleasurable novel. The vocabulary is so extensive that in the first two readings, I gleaned the meanings of certain words from the context. This time, I am reading it on a Kindle which means I can automatically look up words I don't know, which is important in a text which, somehow in a naturalistic and unpretentious way, drops in such gems as "chthonic" "orchae" and even "galapygeous." Not so handy on a Kindle are translations for the copious references fromYiddish, German, Latin, a smattering of Russian and medical terminology, classical lit, popular culture, classical music, etc., but some of these are translated/explicated in the body of the work, or at least the meaning implied well enough to read without a search engine running.
Estrin is a latecomer to the book writing game, and no youngster, but I believe he will see the day when his will be widely considered to be one of the great authorial voices in the canon of modern American literature.

betelgeuze
Alan's insanity is the first obvious thing about him; the reader is thrown directly into the thick of his Hebrew-laced stream-of-conscious patter with no warning or context. Trying to puzzle through the dialogue when it's so thick with mesugahs and goyims and all manner of words I can't begin to guess the meaning of, is truly a chore. That said, it can be entertaining to ride around in the head of someone so obviously deranged as Alan is. If you speak Hebrew and are prepared for lots of long allinonebreath sentences, this may be the book for you!

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