ePub 1695 kb. | Fb2 1609 kb. | DJVU: 1498 kb.
Fiction, Literature

Geek Love: A Novel epub ebook

by Katherine Dunn

Geek Love: A Novel epub ebook

Author: Katherine Dunn
Category: United States
Language: English
Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (June 11, 2002)
Pages: 368 pages
ISBN: 0375713344
ISBN13: 978-0375713347
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 463
Other formats: docx lrf mobi rtf


Katherine Dunn was a novelist and boxing journalist who lived and worked in Oregon. She is the author of three novels: Attic; Truck; and Geek Love, which was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Bram Stoker Prize. Библиографические данные.

Katherine Dunn was a novelist and boxing journalist who lived and worked in Oregon. Geek Love: A Novel Vintage Contemporaries.

Acclaim for katherine dunn’s. Dunn has a forceful, sulfuric, lurid imagination. Katherine Dunn lives and works in Oregon. A tale-spinning machine we are unlikely, ever, to forget. Probably one of the most extraordinary American novels of this decade. A fantasy as opulently grotesque and alive as Gunter Grass’s The Tin Drum. Geek Love is her third novel and was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Bram Stoker Prize. Also by katherine dunn.

Geek Love is a novel by Katherine Dunn, published completely by Alfred A. Knopf (a division of Random House) in 1989. It was a finalist for the National Book Award

Электронная книга "Geek Love: A Novel", Katherine Dunn. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Geek Love:.

Электронная книга "Geek Love: A Novel", Katherine Dunn. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Geek Love: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This item:Geek Love: A Novel by Katherine Dunn Paperback CDN$ 2. 3. Dunn tremendous imagination. Like most great novels, this one keeps the reader marveling at the daring of the author. Philadelphia Inquirer. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Unrelentingly bizarre. perverse but riveting.

For Katherine Dunn, Geek Love (1989) is that novel. The epic saga of the Binewskis, a family of circus freaks, and the tragic fate of their traveling sideshow, Geek Love was a finalist for the National Book Award and has since inspired cultish devotion (just Google Geek Love tattoos ). It has sold more than 475,000 copies in the United States alone. In championing weirdness over the horror of normalcy, the novel became scripture to readers on the margins of the mainstream, attracting such high-profile admirers as Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love. Dunn grafted vaudeville vernacular onto a cool.

National Book Award finalist. Katherine Dunn was a novelist and boxing journalist who lived and worked in Oregon. Here is the unforgettable story of the Binewskis, a circus-geek family whose matriarch and patriarch have bred their own exhibit of human oddities (with the help of amphetamine, arsenic, and radioisotopes). She die. ore about Katherine Dunn. Category: Literary Fiction.

Geek Love is the story of the Binewskis, a carny family whose mater- and paterfamilias set out-with the help of amphetamine, arsenic, and radioisotopes-to breed their own exhibit of human oddities. There’s Arturo the Aquaboy, who has flippers for limbs and a megalomaniac ambition worthy of Genghis Khan.

Katherine Dunn began writing the comic novel Geek Love in the late . Some critics had reservations.

Katherine Dunn began writing the comic novel Geek Love in the late 1970s after her young son refused to join her on a stroll through the famous hybrid rose garden in Portland, Ore. Inspired by the diverse blooms there, Ms. Dunn wondered, What if she could have bred a more obedient boy? . Geek Love, published nearly a decade later, went on to sell hundreds of thousands of copies and become a National Book Award finalist in 1989.

National Book Award finalistHere is the unforgettable story of the Binewskis, a circus-geek family whose matriarch and patriarch have bred their own exhibit of human oddities (with the help of amphetamine, arsenic, and radioisotopes). Their offspring include Arturo the Aquaboy, who has flippers for limbs and a megalomaniac ambition worthy of Genghis Khan . . . Iphy and Elly, the lissome Siamese twins . . . albino hunchback Oly, and the outwardly normal Chick, whose mysterious gifts make him the family’s most precious—and dangerous—asset.  As the Binewskis take their act across the backwaters of the U.S., inspiring fanatical devotion and murderous revulsion; as its members conduct their own Machiavellian version of sibling rivalry, Geek Love throws its sulfurous light on our notions of the freakish and the normal, the beautiful and the ugly, the holy and the obscene. Family values will never be the same.
Reviews (7)
Thozius
Oh, this book. I started it the day that I found out the author had died -- I'd kept meaning to get to it, and that seemed as good a time as any.

I don't know what I expected, but it... wasn't this. Geek Love is about a family of "circus freaks" -- the Binewski clan, where each child was borne of love and a new cocktail of drugs: an albino hunchback little person (and our narrator); conjoined twins; a boy with flippers instead of hands or feet; and one normal-looking child who was almost abandoned. The plot jumps between the past and the present; the reader gleans a portrait of a family brought together with fierce love and loyalty and torn apart by jealousy and fear.

Geek Love isn't a perfect book (I was disappointed with the subplot involving Miss Lick; it seemed underdeveloped), and it's not one that I feel like I can recommend lightly, nor to most readers, but it does tell an amazing story that put me through an emotional wringer, leaving my heart thumping or with tears in my eyes, and every emotion in between. It's about the meaning of family, love, and (blind) devotion, and it's unlike any other family saga I've read.

I recommend it to anyone who has read this review and remains intrigued. It's not an easy book, or a light book, or a book of happy endings, but it is amazing, and worth the effort.

Started: May 13, 2016
Finished: May 21, 2016

Rating: 9/10

Геракл
I don't give this book 5 stars because its deserves 5 stars, I gives this book 5 stars because it is the most strange, most unusual, most impossible book I have ever read. It took one wildly creative mind to come up with the ideas that put this book together. And I enjoyed every crazy minute of it. It took my mind on a circus rollercoaster of a ride of a lifetime I'm inclined to never forget. Its one of those books that startle the mind into the impossible and make it possible and wakes up your minds and says hey, can you do that? Is that possible? And keeps you reading to find out if theres a trick or neat little fancy idea behind whats going on. And the book keeps the mind working. All thru to the end and even past that. It makes you think and wonder and then you find joy here and there. You find yourself laughing at this and that. Shocked or startled by something that is so awesome you have to smile, maybe chuckle, maybe put the book down and giggle a while. These moments exist. As do the sad ones. Where your heart melts and you want to cry. You hurt for a character and just want to cuddle them and hold them and cry with them. Its just that kind of book.

Nahn
I read Geek Love because it's one of Karen Russell's favorite novels. She read it when she was 15. If I had read Geek Love when I was fifteen, especially if I were fifteen in the early nineties (instead of late nineties) I might have enjoyed it a lot more.
The story centers around the Binewskis, a family of "freaks" (conjoined twins, boy with flippers, hunchback albino, telekinetic) who runs a traveling carnival. It reminds me of an R-rated Sam & Max Hit the Road. For a book so full of weirdness and magic and blunt honesty (all things I really would have appreciated at fifteen) it didn't hold my interest much at all. And I'm not sure why. But the sheer imagination behind the book compelled me to read the whole thing, if only so I could move on to something else.
Something about the language deterred me, and made the book feel a lot longer than it was, and sometimes I had to go back and re-read paragraphs just to figure out what was going on. Also, the ending fell flat for me.
I can see how the book was influential in shaping the craft of one of my favorite authors, but it didn't have the same affect on me, in my grizzled old age.

Moonworm
A family is a family, no matter if they are norms or freaks. And a job is a job: tycoon, artist or geek. The responsibility felt by parents, the expectations and shattered dreams of kids, the reality of doing what you have to do to get by: sometimes it all adds up to a family like the Rockefellers and sometimes it adds up to the Binewskis. Who is to say which is the more horrific sum?

Olympia Binewski thinks this: "It is, I suppose, the common grief of children at having to protect their parents from reality. It is bitter for the young to see what awful innocence adults grow into, that terrible vulnerability that must be sheltered from the rodent mire of childhood."

Katherine Dunn: serious, believable, bizarre.

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved