ePub 1848 kb. | Fb2 1421 kb. | DJVU: 1836 kb.
Fiction, Literature

A Bit on the Side epub ebook

by William Trevor

A Bit on the Side epub ebook

Author: William Trevor
Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
Language: English
Publisher: Vintage Canada (September 13, 2005)
Pages: 256 pages
ISBN: 0676976700
ISBN13: 978-0676976700
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 519
Other formats: lrf rtf mobi docx


A bit on the side In 1999 William Trevor received the prestigious David Cohen British Literature Prize in recognition of a lifetime’s literary achievement. And in 2002, he was knighted for his services to literature

A better crafter of stories than Joyce, Chekhov or Updike’ Harpers & Queen. He simply never fails. With the subtlest shift of syntax, an expert change of hue, Trevor leads us through twelve little worlds which, taken together form the sensual, forgiving, sad and admiring universe in which he lives’ Herald. In 1999 William Trevor received the prestigious David Cohen British Literature Prize in recognition of a lifetime’s literary achievement. And in 2002, he was knighted for his services to literature.

A Bit on the Side book. His fiction and short stories are equally good. I joined GoodReads about 2 months ago and wanted to start to build up my library/books read here, since I do enjoy reading.

A Bit on the Side - Twelve remarkable stories by the master storyteller William Trevor. Compassionate, poignant, even heart-rending. Almost perfect works of art by perhaps the greatest short story writer now working in English' Sunday Independent

A Bit on the Side - Twelve remarkable stories by the master storyteller William Trevor. Almost perfect works of art by perhaps the greatest short story writer now working in English' Sunday Independent.

I think this latest collection of William Trevor's stories - his 11th, as good as ever and as recognisable as ever - has the . Trevor is not a benign writer.

I think this latest collection of William Trevor's stories - his 11th, as good as ever and as recognisable as ever - has the wrong title. He's chosen it from a story of muted London adultery, in which the inconclusive lovers part for no very good reason, sad, but sustained by how well they've behaved and by "the delicacy of their reticence".

A Bit on the Side is a wonderful boo. illiam Trevor really is the best short story writer alive. William Trevor's stunning new collection of stories displays this renowned craftsman at the peak of his powers. Michael Dirda, The Washington Post. From the Inside Flap. A middle-aged couple meet in a theatre bar for a squalid blind date; a disappointed priest fears an innocent young girl may run away from home; two self-certain sisters visit a newly widowed local woman.

A better crafter of stories than Joyce, Chekhov or Updike’ Harpers & Queen. How to explain the marvel that is William Trevor? He has retained his abiding sense of wonder and a kindly, if all-seeing, curiosity in humankind, its hopes, sins and failures’ Irish Times. Except in the United States of America, this book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition.

A monument to William Trevor was unveiled in Trevor's native Mitchelstown on 25 August 2004. A Bit On the Side (Viking, 2004). Cheating at Canasta (Viking, 2007).

A monument to William Trevor was unveiled in Trevor's native Mitchelstown on 25 August 2004 On 23 May 2008, the eve of his 80th birthday, a commemorative plaque, indicating the house on Upper Cork Street, Mitchelstown where Trevor was born, was unveiled by Louis McRedmond.

Her face, younger than his and yet not seeming so, was empty of everything except the tiredness she felt. From the window?’ she said. No, he’d go down, he said. Will you get me the coat?

Her face, younger than his and yet not seeming so, was empty of everything except the tiredness she felt. No, he’d go down, he said e boots by the door. She turned away from the bed. He would manage on his own if she didn’t help him: she’d known him for twenty-eight years, been married to him for twenty-three. Whether or not she brought the coat up to him would make no difference, any more than it would if she protested. It could kill you,’ she said

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free.

William Trevor is a master of the nuanced episode and the fraught encounter. Since his first collection of stories, The Day We Got Drunk on Cake (1967), he has perfected a narrative manner in which gravity and decorum coexist with sometimes shocking occurrences, and a faintly comic undertone enlivens the grimmest details. A Bit on the Side begins with "Sitting With the Dead", in which the ending of a similar alliance is envisaged: bleak years, then a death in a farmhouse bedroom, after which comes an incursion by a couple of well-meaning Catholic women whose self-appointed task is to comfort the dying and the bereaved.

William Trevor’s stunning new collection of stories displays this renowned craftsman at the peak of his powers. A middle-aged couple meet in a theatre bar for a squalid blind date; a disappointed priest fears an innocent young girl may run away from home; two self-certain sisters visit a newly widowed local woman. From these slender moments Trevor creates whole lives, conjuring up characters marked by bitterness and loss. William Trevor’s graceful prose is a wonder in itself, and as convincing when inhabiting the mind of a school lunchmaid, an adulterous Irish country librarian or a murderer on the London streets. And as is always the case with William Trevor, venom and tragedy are never far from the still surface of the stories.These stories, many of which first appeared in The New Yorker, are small masterpieces of observation from one of the most highly acclaimed and beloved writers of the century.From the Hardcover edition.
Reviews (7)
CrazyDemon
Great stories. A gifted author.

Alsanadar
He takes us into the thoughts and worlds of everyday people. Shows us the depth and drama behind their conventional social masks, how heroic humans are even in bleak circumstances.

Samuhn
Trevor has a very tacit and smooth style. His writing is light and almost ethereal and neverthless engaging. It's not meant for the spoon-fed reader, but give it a try, chances are you'll like it.

Uste
I have many of William Trevor's short story books. He is one of my favorite authors. highly recommend any of his books. They has not disappointed me yet!

Memuro
William Trevor is like fine wine... one must acquire a taste for his work to truly appreciate the quality of his writings. He has a subtlety that is easily overlooked. If the reader requires constant action to keep from being bored, don't buy this book. But if you are looking for an intelligently told tale, this is the book for you! Highly recommended!

Brazil
this book was painfully boring....no beginning and no end in any of the short stories. I would not recemmend this book.

Meri
Twelve short stories; all good and one masterpiece, the title story kept till the end. “Something was different this morning; on the walk from Chiltern Street she had sensed, for an instant only, that their love affair was not as it had been yesterday.”

In the blurbs, one from the New Yorker, in which Trevor published most of these stories over the years, one critic said “Trevor is probably the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language.” Well, Trevor is gone now, but he’s certainly excellent as a short story writer and as a novelist.

As with his novels, many of the subjects are lonely people, and almost all are leading drab, confined, constrained lives. In one titled “Solitude,” we learn how a young girl became a friendless old lady, living in hotels across Europe, her only acquaintances maids, cooks, bar tenders and bell boys.

In “On the Streets,” a friendless divorced man stalks his former wife. (Married five months – was that a mistake?). He’s a waiter, fixated on and obsessed by a single incident at work for which he was criticized a long time ago.

In “The Dancing-Master’s Music,” a maid at an inn spends her whole life (from age 14 to retirement) working at the inn and reflecting back on a single musical performance. (I’m reminded of another Trevor character, a young man in Silence of the Garden, who goes to see a traveling knife-throwing act as a boy and that seems to end up being the highlight of his life.)

In “Graillis’s Legacy,” a widower, a small town librarian, rejects a substantial inheritance as inappropriate, coming from a woman, a former library patron he knew. It’s as if he worries that it might offend --- who? His dead wife?

Understatement is a strength of Trevor’s prose as in this passage about the village priest from “Justina’s Priest.” “He had seen his congregations fall off and struggled against the feeling that he’d been deserted. Confusion spread from the mores of the times into the Church itself; in combating it, he prayed for guidance but was not heard.” He speaks of a young woman wearing a shirt “with an indecency on it.” (The shirt said “F--- Me.”) In this story the priest intervenes with a young, mentally deficient woman’s family to warn them that she might run off to Dublin with the girl wearing the T-shirt.

A few stories involve couples and married people. (Happily? Of course not, where would the story be?) In “Big Bucks,” a young woman is engaged to a man who goes to America and they plan that she will follow him. Is she in love with him or with a dream of the distant continent?

In “Sitting with the Dead,” the middle-aged Geraghty sisters arrive at the homes of the dead and dying (whether they know you or not). One woman, a widow since the night before, reveals to them a lot more than she intended. Young people would say TMI – too much information!

Great stories!

I am not a William Trevor aficionado, but I found these 12 stories spare, unique and strangely compelling. Trevor manages to draw you into the needs and wants of odd characters in difficult moments. His style is cool and nearly dispassionate--until you realize he is asking us to consider these lives with affection and appreciation. Whether it's first person ("Solitude") or third ("Big Bucks"), the writing doesn't flash or jump out at you, but there is a frankness to the images and the descriptions that rivets you to the spot. The overall mood is longing, disappointment, of things breaking or being broken, of longings unfulfilled.

In some ways, the stories are relatively easy reading--strong but straightforward vocabulary and plain sentence structures. A few times I found myself having to see what scenes Trevor was trying to do--it's almost so quick and cryptic at times that if you blink you'll miss it. He often starts mid-action. "In the theatre bar they still talked, not hurrying over their drinks although an announcement had warned that the performance would begin in two minutes." That's the first sentence from "An Evening Out," a story about the odd verbal dance between a man and a woman who have been set up by a dating service (a nifty tale of competing desires). We are thrust in the side door with Trevor's characters and given a chance to watch and listen. There's a bit of hand-holding by Trevor, but he's judicious in doling out tidbits of back-story.

I'd recommend starting with "A Bit on the Side," the title story and probably the most straightforward. If you like that, you'll get a flavor for his style. Some of the others are more obtuse. After the title story, I liked "An Evening Out," "Sitting with the Dead" and "Sacred Statues." These are all rich stories, however, told by a powerful writer.

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved