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Fiction, Literature

Tropic of Cancer epub ebook

by Henry Miller

Tropic of Cancer epub ebook

Author: Henry Miller
Category: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Grove Press; First Black Cat Illustrated Edition edition (June 1971)
Pages: 287 pages
ISBN: 0394177606
ISBN13: 978-0394177601
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 798
Other formats: doc mobi docx mbr


Tropic of Cancer is a novel by Henry Miller that has been described as "notorious for its candid sexuality" and as responsible for the "free speech that we now take for granted in literature"

Tropic of Cancer is a novel by Henry Miller that has been described as "notorious for its candid sexuality" and as responsible for the "free speech that we now take for granted in literature". Its publication in 1961 in the .

Published simultaneously in Canada. Printed in the United States of America. Miller, Henry, 1891-1980.

Miller quotes Thoreau’s statement, which might almost be the motto of the cosmic writer: Most of what my neighbors call good, I am profoundly convinced is evil, and if I repent anything, it is my good conduct that I repent

Miller quotes Thoreau’s statement, which might almost be the motto of the cosmic writer: Most of what my neighbors call good, I am profoundly convinced is evil, and if I repent anything, it is my good conduct that I repent. One could hardly call Thoreau a criminal, yet he had his run-ins with the law, just as Miller has, and for the same reasons. The strain of anarchism and amorality is growing stronger in American literature, or that branch of it that I am talking about, and Miller is one of its chief carriers. It is not only Emma Goldman, Thoreau, Mark Twain, Whitman, and perhaps Salinger.

Tropic of Cancer, published when he was forty-three and immediately banned in all English-speaking countries, is considered his most important book. Tropic of Cancer recounts the story of Henry Miller's first two years in Paris. Miller's works include Black Spring (1936), Tropic of Capricorn (1939), The Cosmological Eye (1939), The Colossus of Maroussi (1941), The Time of the Assassins (1946), The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945), and his autobiographical trilogy, The Rosy Crucifixion, comprised of Sexus (1949), Plexus (1953), and Nexus (1960). It is perhaps the first novel that redefines the creative process for the working-class writer.

Tropic of Cancer book. Now hailed as an American classic Tropic of Cancer, Henry Miller’s masterpiece, was banned as obscene in this country for twenty-seven years after its first publication in Paris in 1934.

Henry Miller's first book. Tropic of Cancer, was published in Paris in 1934 and was immediately banned in all English-speaking countries. Tropic of Capricorn (1939), which actually covers an earlier period in Miller's life, it makes up a running fictional autobiography remarkable for its candour, gusto, and completeness. The two books have in common a plain-spoken truthfulness, a good-hearted comedy, and a quality of joy discovered somewhere on the far side of despair, things that their author was seldom to match and never to surpass in later self-unravellings.

The major lost opportunity in Turner’s book is any serious discussion of Tropic of Cancer and the sexual revolution.

Frederick Turner’s aim in Renegade is to explain how Tropic of Cancer came to be written, came to be banned and came to be an American Classic. Continue reading the main story. The major lost opportunity in Turner’s book is any serious discussion of Tropic of Cancer and the sexual revolution. The overturning of obscenity laws in the United States and Britain and the defiant rise of the porn industry are part of the extraordinary 1960s zeitgeist, but also part of a new sex war. Advertisement.

Miller's groundbreaking first novel, banned in Britain for almost thirty years, now reinvigorated in a new Harper Perennial Modern Classics edition. A penniless and as yet unpublished writer, Henry Miller arrived in Paris in 1930. Leaving behind a disintegrating marriage and an unhappy career in America, he threw himself into the low-life of bohemian Paris with unwavering gusto. A fictional account of Miller's adventures amongst the prostitutes and pimps, the penniless painters and writers of Montparnasse, Tropic of Cancer is an extravagant and rhapsodic hymn to a world of unrivalled eroticism and freedom. Tropic of Cancer's 1934 publication in France was hailed by Samuel Beckett as 'a momentous event in the history of modern writing'. The novel was subsequently banned in the UK and the USA and not released for publication for a further thirty years.
Reviews (7)
GEL
Wow! What a controversial book. I can see why it was banned and why so many opinions are polarized in the ratings. First of all, I have to warn anyone who is thinking about reading this that there is a lot of crude language and blatant description of sex. That didn't bother me. What I did have trouble with was the misogynistic attitude of the main character, who often simply refers to women using the C word and treats them as objects rather than human beings.

That said, the author is writing about a misogynistic individual living in Paris during the depression and he does it with rawness and some beautifully written passages. Anyone reading this book needs to bear in mind that our culture is very different now. I think that reading this with a group who has a knowledgeable leader or using a reading guide is your best bet if you really want to get something out of it. There's a lot of meat to this book - if you can get underneath the layer of crudeness. It's a stream of consciousness piece about life and what it truly means to be happy, and the author shows us that it doesn't necessarily involve being wealthy.

Who should read this: Fans of authors such as Bukowski and Hemingway.
Who should not read this: Anyone who is squeamish or easily offended.

terostr
Tropic of Cancer gets all the attention, but Tropic of Capricorn may be the more important book. Written five years later, we see Miller's earlier years in Brooklyn, his total alienation and disgust with America, his early sexual exploits. If you haven't read Miller before, do not expect a novel or any cohesive structure to the book. Between short autobiographical episodes, often hilarious and explicit, he goes on long lyrical rants which amount to prose poems a la Whitman. Some are overblown philosophical/religious rants, others explorations into the nature of sex, modern man, art, America, what have you. If you are easily offended, avoid this book. If you don't want your vocabulary expanded, avoid this book. Miller's first marriage is sort of a background to the action, a marriage so loveless that he refers to his family only as "the wife" and "the kid" as he pursues other women continually. Near the end, he meets his second wife, June, not mentioning her by name, but doing a dissection of her character, as a prequel to The Rosy Cruxifixion trilogy. He also brings himself into the Dadaist and Surrealist circles, claiming he was the first American Dadaist without knowing it. Regardless of what you think of Henry and his influence on American literature, this book's worth reading. Two middle fingers up!

Onath
Reading Henry Miller is the ultimate literary contradiction. On the one hand, he is a wordsmith with very few equals. The imagination would have to stretch very little to see Miller and William F. Buckley in the salons of Paris in a much earlier time enjoying a glass of the finest wine that Europe had to offer while discussing the politics of the day. In a different time and place, Miller could easily be pictured in a sleazy bar in Manhattan sharing a draft with Larry Flynt deciding the contents of the next edition of Hustled magazine. In Tropic of Cancer, Miller is able to transform himself from Monet painting beautiful pictures with words to the lowest form of humanity crawling out of the swamps of history. This book probably should be shelved in the libraries and bookstores of the world under "Guilty Pleasures"'

Magis
Having, for the past 63 years, regarded this book as a victim of prissy, uptight, Victorian-style censorship . . . I was stunned when I finally read it this summer and discovered that (in my opinion and my grown son's opinion) it is nothing but truly disgusting filth, wrapped in a cheap veneer of embarrassingly pretentious, totally sophomoric-sounding pseudo-philosophy that would quickly earn a "D" in any college philosophy class.

I think porn is healthy and totally harmless, and I think we need a lot more really good porn.. But this garbage isn't porn. There's not a single erotic or sexually arousing sentence in the whole book. It just wallows in disgusting -- often nauseating -- filth, purely for the sake of filth. I mean "filth" as in dirty toilets and dung . . . NOT sex..

My grown son is definitely no prude. But he put it this way: "It reads like an adolescent just using a lot of dirty words, purely for the sake of using dirty words." Most of us outgrew that childish urge at age 20. No, it should never have been censored -- not EVER!!!. If people really want to wallow in filth, they ought to be perfectly free to do so. But we can get that for free on the walls of the nearest latrine. Most of us have a lot better uses for our time.

You couldn't possibly pay me enough to waste my time reading this garbage again. Ewww.

Thetalas
Oddly arranged, and strangely strung together, but once I managed to get into the peculiar rhythm of Miller's flow, I was nothing less than enchanted. Some moments are blatantly candid and real (some might say offensive), and others are poetically raw and heart wrenching. His scope for manipulating prose has made this a truly memorable book for me, and probably one of my favourite to date.

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