» » Liberty against the Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies
hotellemcasadeicervia.it
ePub 1614 kb. | Fb2 1237 kb. | DJVU: 1411 kb.
Fiction, Literature

Liberty against the Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies epub ebook

by Christopher Hill

Liberty against the Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies epub ebook

Author: Christopher Hill
Category: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books (February 1, 1998)
Pages: 368 pages
ISBN: 0140240330
ISBN13: 978-0140240337
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 514
Other formats: azw lrf rtf doc


Renowned English historian Hill (The English Bible and the Seventeenth-Century Revolution, 1993, et. uses popular literature and ballads to shape a stimulating critique of the concept of liberty in 17th-century England's struggle between king and Parliament. Even today, the English Civil War, Cromwell's Protectorate, the Restoration of the monarchy under Charles II, and the Glorious Revolution of 1688 are still commonly viewed as an inevitable progress toward popular liberty.

Liberty Against the Law book. Start by marking Liberty Against the Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies as Want to Read

Liberty Against the Law book. Start by marking Liberty Against the Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Renowned English historian Hill (The English Bible and the Seventeenth-Century Revolution .

Renowned English historian Hill (The English Bible and the Seventeenth-Century Revolution, 1993, et.

In the plays and popular folklore of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are many expressions of liberty against the law. Taking this literary theme as his starting point, Christopher Hill examines how seventeenth-century. Taking this literary theme as his starting point, Christopher Hill examines how seventeenth-century society and its laws looked to the mass of the landless and lawless classes. In the plays and popular folklore of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are many expressions of liberty against the law.

Liberty Against the Law. Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies

Liberty Against the Law. Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies. Category: World Politics. In this, the last book published during his lifetime, renowned historian of the English Revolution Christopher Hill explores the immense social changes that occurred and the expressions of liberty against the law through the literary culture of the times and the hero-worship of the outlaw. As well as chapters on gypsies and vagabonds, Hill analyses class, religion and the shift away from the importance of the church after the Reformation. 1st ed. by Christopher Hill. Published 1996 by Allen Lane, Penguin Books in London, New York, .

Liberty Against The Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies (1996) .

Liberty Against The Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies (1996), ISBN 0-14-024033-0. Pennington, Donald, "John Edward Christopher Hill", in British Academy, Proceedings of the British Academy: Volume 130: Biographical Memoirs of Fellows, IV Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2005, pp. 23–49. Richardson, R. The Debate on the English Revolution Revisited, London: Methuen, 1977.

Items related to Liberty Against the Law: Some Seventeenth Century Controvers. Christopher Hill, the peerless people's historian of the 17th century, has written a book that challenges the common history of liberty and the birth of liberal politics. Christopher Hill Liberty Against the Law: Some Seventeenth Century Controversies. While historians from Lord Acton to J. H. Hexter have written histories in which property-holding men figure as the champions of liberal freedom, Professor Hill deftly illustrates the manner in which enclosure laws and claims to property were used to deny the traditional rights of the common folk of 17th-century England. Some Seventeenth-Century. With ''Liberty Against the Law,'' the English Marxist historian Christopher Hill returns to England's early modern history, dissecting the Puritan revolution that failed and the Whig revolution that succeeded. His loosely structured essays explore a common theme: how the rise of Parliament and the rule of law masked the cold-blooded seizure of power by the upper classes, people who thought liberty was synonymous with property. Rejecting liberal tradition,.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Liberty against the Law: Some Seventeenth-Century Controversies . The item may have some signs of cosmetic wear, but is fully operational and functions as intended.

The item may have some signs of cosmetic wear, but is fully operational and functions as intended. This item may be a floor model or store return that has been used. See details for description of any imperfections.

In the plays and popular folklore of the 17th and 18th centuries are many expressions of liberty against the law: there are the colorful beggars of "The Jovial Crew" who are no worse than the eminent politicians; the ballads of Robin Hood personify the opposition between the freedom of the outlaw in the woods and the status constraints on the society man. Christopher Hill considers how the peasantry was effected by enclosures, the loss of many traditional rights, and draconian punishments for minor transgressions. These expressions of contempt for the law challenge the equation of law with property and begin to pose the question, "Freedom for Whom?" Wrote Keith Thomas in The Guardian, "Hill must have read more of the literature written in and about 17-century England than anyone who has ever lived. He misses nothing."
Reviews (3)
grand star
Classic!

Adorardana
The late pre-eminent historian of the under classes of the English Revolution, Christopher Hill, has taken the myriad literary and cultural ideas, serious and zany, that surfaced during the period between 1620-1720, the heart of the conversion of England from an agricultural to an embryonic capitalist economy, and given us his take on some previously understudied and misunderstood notions, many that have not made the conventional history books. I note that he uses as his endpoint John Gay's Beggar's Opera, a work later adapted for the stage by Bertolt Brecht, and that I have reviewed elsewhere in this space (see September 2007 archives). One of the points discussed in that review is whether the figure of one MacHealth the central figure of the work, former imperial soldier and leader of a profitable criminal gang is an incipient capitalist or the relic of an earlier age. Professor Hill's book would seem to provide ammunition for the proposition that Mac Health, like the legendary Robin Hood, was a representative figure of `freedom' from the imperatives of capitalist contract, routine and law and harked back to the values of the old pastoral society.

In this expansively footnoted book Mr. Hill, as he has done elsewhere, connects the dramatic break-up of traditional agrarian English society; the resulting vast increase of 'masterless' men not bound to traditional authority and potentially receptive to new ideas; the widespread availability of the protestant Bible brought about by the revolution in printing and thus permitting widespread distribution to the masses; the effects of the Protestant Reformation on individual responsibility; the discrediting of the theology of the divine right of kings; the role of the priesthood of all believers that foreshadow a very modern concept of the validity of individual religious expression; radical interpretations of equality and primitive communism, particularly the work of Gerrard Winstanley ; the Puritan ethic and many more subjects of interests to bring to life what the common people who hitherto had barely entered the stage of history were reading, watching, thinking and doing.

Professor Hill as well, using the extensive prose and poetic literature of the age as a guide, gives us a rudimentary cultural tour of how the under classes responded to the break down of their tradition agrarian lives (and the generally brutal reply of the ruling classes). Elsewhere he has discussed `masterless' men driven out of the villages, forests and fens by the enclosures of the land in the interest of capitalist agricultural production for the market. Here he discusses the literature developed around those men (and women). He tackles, for those who know his work, the now familiar themes of Robin Hood, highwaymen, vagrants, beggars and the like. He moreover, as always, connects trends in biblical interpretation with their effect on the on-going social changes. Furthermore he does an extensive study of the literature of English imperialist expansion during the period connecting up such subjects as the `noble savage', `going native' and the effects of imperial expansion on both the oppressed and the oppressor. While he brings in his usual cast of characters like the Seekers, Ranters and Quakers and individuals like Abiezer Coppe and others they are more background figures in this exposition. I would suggest that before one tackles this work that a reading of Professor Hill's The World Turned Upside Down is in order.

LONUDOG
Christopher Hill analyses the most traumatic event in English history - the loss of Land Rights by a large part of the English population around the seventeenth century. Under the Enclosures and other related Acts, large landowners seized land hitherto under common ownership, forcing the villagers to migrate to shanty towns on the edges of cities, to wait, handily, as a pool of cheap labour for the burgeoning industrial capitalist economy, a picture now all too readily associated with the third world in this century.
The results were very similar to those found today in third world countries where indigenous peoples are deprived of their cultural heritage and their physical means of survival, by the seizing of their garden, grazing, and hunting lands, and Hill follows - as well as the cargo cults of the time - the libertarian reactions to this dispossession: the Diggers, Levellers, pirates (research Burroughs must have drawn on for his fine last book "Ghost of! Chance"), and the very considerable literary rebellion against the beginnings of what, with the final flowering of agribusiness, is today referred to as "The Killing of the Countryside" (Graham Harvey, Cape.)
This reminder of the depth and strength of the English libertarian tradition is extremely timely in a world that again gives us the poor dispossessed and legislated against under Globalisation - the expropriated Third World not just in Bougainville or the Amazon, but in James Kelman's Glasgow or Loach's Liverpool. It is small wonder that we are again seeing Levellers and Diggers. They belong to a long and deeply ingrained English tradition, as does Christopher Hill and his considerable body of work on this period, of which this book is a brilliant, readable and heartfelt synthesis.

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved