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Ladies' Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture That Made Them epub ebook

by Noliwe M. Rooks

Ladies' Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture That Made Them epub ebook

Author: Noliwe M. Rooks
Category: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press; None ed. edition (June 9, 2004)
Pages: 224 pages
ISBN: 0813534240
ISBN13: 978-0813534244
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 415
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Noliwe M. Rooks’s Ladies’ Pages sheds light on the most influential .

Ladies’ Pages demonstrates how these rare and thought-provoking publications contributed to the development of African American culture and the ways in which they in turn reflect important historical changes in black communities

Noliwe M. Rooks's Ladies' Pages sheds light on the most influential African American women's  .

Rooks reveals in detail how these publications contributed to the concepts of black sexual identity, rape, migration, urbanization, fashion, domesticity, consumerism, and education. Her book is essential reading for everyone interested in the history and culture of African Americans.

Noliwe M. Rooks's Ladies' Pages sheds light on the most influential African American women's magazines .

What African American women wore, bought, consumed, read, cooked, and did at home with their families were all fair game, and each of the magazines offered copious amounts of advice about what such choices could and did mean. Rooks’s Ladies’ Pages sheds light on the most influential African American women’s magazines––Ringwood’s Afro-American Journal of Fashion, Half-Century Magazine for the Colored Beginning in the late nineteenth century, mainstream magazines established ideal images of white female culture, while comparable African American periodicals were cast among the shadows.

Ladies' Pages is an original and intriguing study of black women's magazines in the United States. Much of the material in the book was new information for me. For example, I was unaware of the rich history of African American and particularly African American women's magazines before Essence and Ebony. I was also unaware that black males founded Essence and of the relationships between Essence and Latina magazine

Noliwe M. Rooks'sLadies' Pagessheds light on the most influential African American women's magazines .

Ladies' Pagesdemonstrates how these rare and thought-provoking publications contributed to. the development of African American culture and the ways in which they in turn reflect important historical changes in black communities.

Her second book, Ladies Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture that Made Them (Rutgers University Press) was published in 2004

Her second book, Ladies Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture that Made Them (Rutgers University Press) was published in 2004. Her most recent book, White Money/Black Power: African American Studies and the Crises of Race in Higher Education was published in 2006 with Beacon Press. Art. Politics" a special issue of NKA: Journal of Contemporary Art, Duke University Press, Fall 2015, No. 37 and Women and Magazines in the 21st Century: Race, Writing and New Media (Under Consideration).

Ladies Pages: African American Women’s Magazines and the Culture that Made Them (Rutgers University Press, 2004). White Money/Black Power: African American Studies and the Crises of Race in Higher Education (Beacon Press, 2007). Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education (The New Press, 2017).

The magazine staff was made up of women who had an affiliation with State University. Rooks, Noliwe M. (2004). Ladies' Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture that Made Them. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. Our Women and Children was one of them  . ISBN 978-0-8135-3424-4.

Her earlier books are: Hair Raising: Beauty, Culture and African American Women; Ladies Pages: African American Women’s Magazines and the Culture that Made Them and White Money/Black Power: African American Studies and the Crises of Race in Higher Education. Rooks received her . from Spelman College where she majored in English and her . and PhD degrees in American Studies from the University of Iowa. She is currently the Director of American Studies at Cornell University where she is a Professor in Africana Studies and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Beginning in the late nineteenth century, mainstream magazines established ideal images of white female culture, while comparable African American periodicals were cast among the shadows. Noliwe M. Rooks’s Ladies’ Pages sheds light on the most influential African American women’s magazines––Ringwood’s Afro-American Journal of Fashion, Half-Century Magazine for the Colored Homemaker, Tan Confessions, Essence, and O, the Oprah Magazine––and their little-known success in shaping the lives of black women.Ladies’ Pages demonstrates how these rare and thought-provoking publications contributed to the development of African American culture and the ways in which they in turn reflect important historical changes in black communities. What African American women wore, bought, consumed, read, cooked, and did at home with their families were all fair game, and each of the magazines offered copious amounts of advice about what such choices could and did mean. At the same time, these periodicals helped African American women to find work and to develop a strong communications network. Rooks reveals in detail how these publications contributed to the concepts of black sexual identity, rape, migration, urbanization, fashion, domesticity, consumerism, and education.  Her book is essential reading for everyone interested in the history and culture of African Americans.

Reviews (2)
Dozilkree
Good research book. Very Interesting.

Anarius
Ladies' Pages is an original and intriguing study of black women's magazines in the United States. Much of the material in the book was new information for me. For example, I was unaware of the rich history of African American and particularly African American women's magazines before Essence and Ebony. I was also unaware that black males founded Essence and of the relationships between Essence and Latina magazine. A strength of the book is that it provides insights into the migration experiences of African American women during the early twentieth century, an often overlooked topic. Moreover, Rooks' examination of issues of respectability, sexuality, domesticity, and urbanization in early women's magazines provides an historical perspective that is useful for understanding African American women in contemporary popular culture. While the book may have been enriched by more thorough examination of why particular magazines lasted as long as they did, by a less abrupt conclusion and by more analysis of O Magazine and the recent changes in Essence magazine, the book still was one of the most informative books I have read in a while.

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