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A People of One Book: The Bible and the Victorians epub ebook

by Timothy Larsen

A People of One Book: The Bible and the Victorians epub ebook

Author: Timothy Larsen
Category: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 15, 2011)
Pages: 336 pages
ISBN: 0199570094
ISBN13: 978-0199570096
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 444
Other formats: mbr mobi lrf rtf


Larsen's book brilliantly and engagingly illuminates the extent to which the Victorians were 'a people of one book' by exploring the hold of the Bible in the lives and writings of 12 representative figures.

Larsen's book brilliantly and engagingly illuminates the extent to which the Victorians were 'a people of one book' by exploring the hold of the Bible in the lives and writings of 12 representative figures. Commendably and refreshingly more than half his case studies are of women. Larsen helps us to consider them wih fresh perspective. -Journal of British Studies.

Although the Victorians were awash in texts, the Bible was such a pervasive and dominant presence that they may fittingly be thought of as 'a people of one book'. They habitually read the Bible, quoted it, adopted its phraseology as their own, thought in its categories, and viewed their own lives and experiences through a scriptural lens.

Although the Victorians were awash in texts, the Bible was such a pervasive and dominant presence that they may fittingly be thought of as 'a people of one book'

Although the Victorians were awash in texts, the Bible was such a pervasive and dominant presence that they may fittingly be thought of as 'a people of one book'. This astonishingly deep, relentless, and resonant engagement with the Bible was true across the religious spectrum from Catholics to Unitarians and beyond. This astonishingly deep, relentless, and resonant engagement with the Bible was true across the religious spectrum fromCatholics to Unitarians and beyond.

A People of One Book book. Although the Victorians were awash in texts, the Bible was such a pervasive and dominant presence that they may fittingly be thought of as 'a people of one book'.

Larsen confirms thrice over that the Bible did indeed play a central role in the life of the Victorians and .

Larsen confirms thrice over that the Bible did indeed play a central role in the life of the Victorians and that believers and unbelievers alike were enveloped in its words, images, and allusions. The author is at his best in summarizing, in pamphlet, sermon, book, and manuscript, the manner in which significant nineteenth-century figures-nowadays identified primarily with secular causes-were often preoccupied with the scriptures.

Timothy Larsen’s purpose in writing A People of One Book is to demonstrate the extent to which the Bible dominated .

Timothy Larsen’s purpose in writing A People of One Book is to demonstrate the extent to which the Bible dominated Victorian thought and culture. He claims that this has yet to be fully grasped, and endeavours to prove his thesis by offering a detailed examination of how Scripture was central to the experience of divergent groupings in Victorian England. Throughout his book the author seeks to undermine the simplistic assumption that what the Victorians wrote about the Bible represented the most uninteresting aspects of their works.

The Book of Judges and The Book of Ruth. A study of the parables common to the Synoptic Gospels and the Coptic Gospels of Thomas /. Sheppard. Thesis (Ph. -Catholic University of America, 1984. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 378-400). Doane, e. Anglo-Saxon Bibles and "The Book of Cerne" (Mary P. Richards). Mary P. Richards, University of Delaware, mpr.

In this book, Timothy Larsen seeks to show that the Bible "loomed uniquely large in Victorian culture" (1). His argument focuses on individuals as representative of particular religious traditions (E. B. Pusey, Anglo-Catholic; Nicholas Wiseman, Roman Catholic; Charles Bradlaugh an. . Pusey, Anglo-Catholic; Nicholas Wiseman, Roman Catholic; Charles Bradlaugh and Annie Besant, atheist; Catherine Booth and William Cooke, Methodist and Holiness; Florence Nightingale, Liberal Anglican; Mary Carpenter, Unitarian; Elizabeth Fry, Quaker; T. H. Huxley, agnostic; Josephine Butler, Evangelical Anglican; C. Spurgeon, Old Dissent).

Although the Victorians were awash in texts, the Bible was such a pervasive and dominant presence that they may fittingly be thought of as 'a people of one book'. They habitually read the Bible, quoted it, adopted its phraseology as their own, thought in its categories, and viewed their own lives and experiences through a scriptural lens. This astonishingly deep, relentless, and resonant engagement with the Bible was true across the religious spectrum from Catholics to Unitarians and beyond. The scripture-saturated culture of nineteenth-century England is displayed by Timothy Larsen in a series of lively case studies of representative figures ranging from the Quaker prison reformer Elizabeth Fry to the liberal Anglican pioneer of nursing Florence Nightingale to the Baptist preacher C. H. Spurgeon to the Jewish author Grace Aguilar. Even the agnostic man of science T. H. Huxley and the atheist leaders Charles Bradlaugh and Annie Besant were thoroughly and profoundly preoccupied with the Bible. Serving as a tour of the diversity and variety of nineteenth-century views, Larsen's study presents the distinctive beliefs and practices of all the major Victorian religious and sceptical traditions from Anglo-Catholics to the Salvation Army to Spiritualism, while simultaneously drawing out their common, shared culture as a people of one book.
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