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Fiction, Literature

Beneath a Marble Sky: A Love Story epub ebook

by John Shors

Beneath a Marble Sky: A Love Story epub ebook

Author: John Shors
Category: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: NAL Trade; Reprint edition (June 6, 2006)
Pages: 344 pages
ISBN: 0451218469
ISBN13: 978-0451218469
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 841
Other formats: lit lrf doc mbr


The Clarity of Twilight. Shors, John, 1969- Beneath a marble sky : a novel of the Taj Mahal, John Shors. Part 1. The minute I heard my first love story, I started looking for you, not knowing.

The Clarity of Twilight. Beneath a. Marble Sky. A Novel of the Taj Mahal. McPherson & Company. Published by McPherson & Company. Post Office Box 1126, Kingston, New York 12402. 1st ed. p. cm. ISBN 29701-71-2 (hardcover : alk. paper) 1. Mumtaz Mahal, Empress, consort of Shahjahan, Emperor of India, d. 1631-Fiction.

Beneath a Marble Sky is a story which literally speaks to you. In his first novel, John Shors brilliantly recounts one of the world’s greatest love stories, narrated against a backdrop of hatred and violence. Jahanara is a beguiling heroine whom readers will come to love; none of today’s chick-lit heroines can match her dignity, fortitude and cunning. Elegant, often lyrical, writing distinguishes this literary fiction from the genre known as historical romance. It is truly a work of art, rare in a debut novel. The Des Moines Register

Beneath a Marble Sky book. The author wove such a beautiful story about the loves of the main character.

Beneath a Marble Sky book. What I mean is that Shors does an I picked up Beneath A Marble Sky because of the cover. I'm so glad I did. BAMS is a near perfect story.

over the tragic death of his beloved wife, commissioned the building of a grand mausoleum as a testament to the marvel of their love.

Journey to dazzling 17th century Hindustan, where the reigning emperor, consumed with grief over the tragic death of his beloved wife, commissioned the building of a grand mausoleum as a testament to the marvel of their love. This monument would soon become known as the Taj Mahal.

Nizam said the mountains were cooler and thus traveling in darkness was unnecessary. In fact, the path would soon grow treacherous, and even our surefooted horses would need light. In fact, the path would soon grow treacherous, and even our surefooted horses would need light ew we crossed the river, then eased into the foothills. Peaks towered majestically above us, and I found myself often gazing toward Paradise. The mountains made me think of green waves. They rose from the earth, shrouded in mist, to lap at the underbellies of clouds. I couldn’t fathom why, but as we neared the range, the arid land of Hindustan grew fertile

John Shors reimagined one of the world’s greatest love stories-the romance that inspired the Taj Mahal-in his critically acclaimed, international bestseller Beneath a Marble Sky. Now, with Unbound.

John Shors reimagined one of the world’s greatest love stories-the romance that inspired the Taj Mahal-in his critically acclaimed, international bestseller Beneath a Marble Sky. Shors recreates an ancient and celebrated Chinese legend about a pair of young lovers separated by war and the Great Wall. The year is 1548, and the Chinese Empire faces an imminent Mongol invasion. All that prevents the violent end of a dynasty is the Great Wall.

In Beneath a Marble Sky John Shors recreates an historical Hindustan .

In Beneath a Marble Sky John Shors recreates an historical Hindustan brimming with breathtaking intrigue and containing the secret truth of the Taj Mahal for a world still in awe of its enduring majesty. Beneath a Marble Sky is a remarkable book, an impressive debut that will enchant anyone fortunate enough to read it. San Antonio Express-News - William Day. Beneath a Marble Sky is a tale of exquisite beaut. ich in detail, ambition, and vitality.

Beneath a Marble Sky brims with action and intrigue befitting an epic era when, alongside continuous war, architecture and its attendant arts reached a pinnacle of perfection

Beneath a Marble Sky brims with action and intrigue befitting an epic era when, alongside continuous war, architecture and its attendant arts reached a pinnacle of perfection.

Journey to dazzling seventeenth-century Hindustan, where the reigning emperor, consumed with grief over the tragic death of his beloved wife, commissioned the building of a grand mausoleum as a testament to the marvel of their love. This monument would soon become known as the Taj Mahal-a sight famous around the world for its beauty and the emotions it symbolizes.

As Shors rewrote Beneath a Marble Sky dozens of times, "a lot of thought . COSTCO HAS 50 signed copies of John Shors' Beneath a Marble Sky to give away. Shors tells the story through Jahanara, the emperor's daughter

COSTCO HAS 50 signed copies of John Shors' Beneath a Marble Sky to give away. Shors tells the story through Jahanara, the emperor's daughter. As her father commissions the Taj Mahal to pay tribute to his dead wife, Jaharana deals with her own passion for the structure's architect.

Journey to dazzling seventeenth-century Hindustan, where the reigning emperor, consumed with grief over the tragic death of his beloved wife, commissioned the building of a grand mausoleum as a testament to the marvel of their love. This monument would soon become known as the Taj Mahal—a sight famous around the world for its beauty and the emotions it symbolizes.

Princess Jahanara, the courageous daughter of the emperor and his wife, recounts their mesmerizing tale, while sharing her own parallel story of forbidden love with the celebrated architect of the Taj Mahal. Set during a time of unimaginable wealth and power, murderous sibling rivalries, and cruel despotism, this impressive novel sweeps you away to a historical Hindustan brimming with action and intrigue in an era when, alongside the brutalities of war and oppression, architecture and the art of love and passion reached a pinnacle of perfection.

Reviews (7)
digytal soul
I read John Shor’s Beneath the Marble Sky because I had in my book goals to read a romance of some sort. So, I will admit that this is not my usual fare, and I’m not the ideal audience for the novel. As it happens, my response to the novel was mixed--as you might expect.

I admired several things about the book. It was a quick book with a lot of romance and exciting plot twists. It does certainly succeed as a light and mostly fun novel. I also admired the spunk and intelligence (which she uses most of the time) of the main character Jahanara. Mainly, I enjoyed learning more about this time period and setting.

However, several things drove me crazy about the book. First, the love scenes between Jahanara and Isa were too one-note. All gush. They don’t get to know each other; their relationship doesn’t develop and grow through trials, particularly. Instead, they love each other madly, and all scenes between them consist of ecstatic exhortations of how much they love each other. That would all be fine if there was more to the relationship to make it seem more real.

My main problem with the book, though, was the pretty unbelievable plot elements that were in the novel. It’s a historical stretch that Jahanara would be given all of the power that she is afforded in the novel (i.e. that this culture would allow Jahanara to act as the emperor’s agent for the building of the Taj Mahal), though this is maybe something that I can take, so that there can be a novel. The bigger stretch is that Jahanara takes the just mind-bogglingly stupid risks that she takes in the final 40 pages of the novel after her character has been so firmly established for the previous 320 pages as being a good judge of people and situations and as placing as her highest priorities Isa and her child. The things that happen toward the end of the book make utterly no sense after reading the rest of the novel.

So, this is one of those books that I enjoyed for virtually the whole way through and then ended up frustrated by at the end. Judging from its popularity, obviously, can be a satisfying read for its target audience, but it fell a little short for me.

Dandr
John Shors says 65% of this novel is based on hard facts - all the royal characters were real people and acted as they did in the book. So he's used a bit of "poetic licence" to tell a good tale. It's certainly worth a read, so long as you are not pedantic about historical fiction being 100% accurate.

But this novel is more than historical fiction I think. Beautifully written (in the first person narrative through the eyes of Princess Jahanara), with evocative imagery, it is an epic story depicting the downfall of a royal empire. In a similar vein to Ken Follett's Pillars of the Earth (but much shorter), it covers powerful emotions - greed, lust, power, resilience, love - between siblings, parents and children and of course, men and women. I enjoyed it more than I expected to. I also felt it has relevance to today's world, by illustrating the societal impact of liberal versus orthodox perspectives in religion and using the latter to justify discrimination, war and genocide.

It's a captivating read. I highly recommend it

Rit
"Temple" is the sixth (of six --yes, I'm a fan!) books by John Shors that I have read and thoroughly enjoyed. He is an especially imaginative and creative writer. The plots and characters in each of his novels are totally different and well developed. He does not use the same theme over and over again, just renaming the characters and locations. Shors also seems equally adept at writing convincingly in both modern and ancient genres. He is able to make me feel part of the "action" in every plot. Shors skill at building to a dramatic climax, brings his readers right along. In the last part of "Temple", I actually found myself holding my breath as I turned the pages! (Breath-holding usually only happens to me in very suspense-filled movies). I would highly recommend this novel to anyone who relishes stories that are unique, compelling and masterfully written.

Unde
I read this book prior to a trip to Angkor Wat. I thought it would help me understand the history a bit better, since it had been mentioned in some articles as a good book to read prior to a visit. But let's face it, the term "bodice ripper" comes to mind. It's a romance. So it was a bit of a disappointment in that regard. But entertaining just the same.

Ieregr
I just finished reading "Temple of a Thousand Faces" after returning from Cambodia on a delightful, exciting trip visiting many of the temples, the jungle and the floating villages on the gigantic lake that are the setting for this book. Reading the book, I felt as if I were really living in Ancient Cambodia. The people John Shors created were so human and the site so true to what I had been in that I felt I was actually there with them. I did wonder if it would have been better to read the book before I went to Cambodia, for then I might have felt I was experiencing the story unfolding as I walked through the Jungle and could see the characters Shors had introduced me to. However, I decided that there was also an advantage to reading it after I was in Cambodia for, as I read the book, the locations and settings were so familiar to me that I was able to live the whole experience with the book's characters!

I was equally impressed with Shors' book Beneath a Marble Sky which I read before I went to India. Having read it, and getting to know the characters and being introduced to the settings before went, I felt that I enjoyed the Taj Mahal more than most of the people on the trip I was on, for I felt I was visiting people who lived there, who I knew intimately and I could picture them in each now bare room and setting but as it had been furnished when they lived. Now I wonder if it might have been equally fun or even more rewarding to have read the book when I returned from India and was familiar with the settings!

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