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Fiction, Literature

Sardinian Brigade (Lost Treasures) epub ebook

by Marion Rawson,Emilio Lussu

Sardinian Brigade (Lost Treasures) epub ebook

Author: Marion Rawson,Emilio Lussu
Category: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Prion Books; 1st Edition edition (February 1, 2000)
Pages: 286 pages
ISBN: 1853753602
ISBN13: 978-1853753602
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 900
Other formats: azw rtf docx mobi


Sardinian Brigade (Lost Treasures) Paperback – February 1, 2000.

Sardinian Brigade (Lost Treasures) Paperback – February 1, 2000. by. Emilio Lussu (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Manufacturer: Prion Books Ltd Release date: 14 January 2000 ISBN-10 : 1853753602 ISBN-13: 9781853753602.

Sardinian Brigade" is a piece of war writing written with sparse simplicity

Sardinian Brigade" is a piece of war writing written with sparse simplicity. The cumulative picture is: endless taking and losing of trenches; the deaths of comrades; his tragic visit to his parents who put on a brave face yet are terrified they will never see him alive again; and the Italian soldier who refuses to shoot an Austrian in his sights.

by. Lussu, Emilio, 1890-1975. Lussu, Emilio, 1890-1975, World War, 1914-1918, Soldiers, World War, 1914-1918.

Emilio Lussu (December 4, 1890 – March 5, 1975) was an Italian soldier, politician, antifascist and a writer. Lussu was born in Armungia, province of Cagliari (Sardinia) and graduated with a degree in law in 1914. Lussu married Joyce Salvadori, a notable poet, and member of the noble Paleotti family of the Marche, who were counts of Fermo. Prior to the entry of Italy into World War I, Lussu joined the army and was involved in several skirmishes.

The Mechanized Brigade "Sassari" is a mechanized infantry brigade of the Italian Army, based on the island of Sardinia

The Mechanized Brigade "Sassari" is a mechanized infantry brigade of the Italian Army, based on the island of Sardinia. Its core are three infantry regiments which distinguished themselves in combat during World War I. Carrying the name of the Sardinian city of Sassari the brigade's coat of arms is modeled after the city's coat of arms. The brigade is part of the Division "Acqui".

Marion Slawson has 431 books on Goodreads, and is currently reading Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver, The Yield by Tara . They will not be notified.

Marion Slawson has 431 books on Goodreads, and is currently reading Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver, The Yield by Tara June Winch, and Stay Sexy &.

Marion Rawson (August 17, 1899 – October 29, 1980) was an American archaeologist. She is known for her work with Carl Blegen at Pylos in Greece and ancient Troy in modern Turkey. After her death, the University of Cincinnati established the Marion Rawson Professorship of Aegean Prehistory "in honor of her contributions to the field of Bronze Age Archaeology.

Marion Rawson was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. She attended Wykeham Rise School for Girls in Washington, Connecticut. She enrolled at Bryn Mawr College in 1918.

Treasure Rawson is a post production coordinator for The Lion Guard. Treasure Rawson has worked on many Disney TV series, including Gravity Falls, Phineas and Ferb, Sofia the First and Wander over Yonder

Treasure Rawson is a post production coordinator for The Lion Guard. Treasure Rawson has worked on many Disney TV series, including Gravity Falls, Phineas and Ferb, Sofia the First and Wander over Yonder. She also worked on the video game, Stitch Experiment 626. Never Judge a Hyena by Its Spots (post-production coordinator). The Rise of Makuu (post-production coordinator). Bunga the Wise (post-production coordinator). Can't Wait to be Queen (post-production coordinator).

Some of the fiercest fighting of World War I took place in the Alps between the Italian army and the forces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Half a million Italians died or were wounded, yet this is the only autobiographical novel of note to emerge. Written with classic simplicity, it tells of the daily life of soldiers at the front: of many noble characters, like the narrator, the last officer surviving from the beginning of war; of some mad ones, like General Leone who marched along the trenches all night, shouting "Stay awake! Your General does not sleep!" and the endless taking and losing of trenches, the deaths of comrades and the snatched days of love. Written in 1939, this is a forgotten masterpiece from a forgotten front.
Reviews (3)
Dilmal
Very interesting book.

Keath
Almost a century after World War I, the indelible image that remains in Western minds is of a generation of British and French youth sent from rat-infested trenches to get mowed down by the tools of modern warfare in some French or Belgian nightmare landscape. A whole body of literature emerged from that experience, including several works that are still much-read today. However, there were many other equally brutal but far less celebrated fronts in the war, such as the Italian/Austro-Hungarian one. Hemingway set A Farewell to Arms amidst those lines, but few native depictions have made it into English. Indeed, as Lussu notes in the preface, "In italy no such books about the war exist as those that have been published in England, France, and Germany." It is worth noting that this book only exists as a result of Lussu's forced idleness while in prison on anti-fascist charges from 1926-29. He then managed a spectacular escape to France, became a leading Resistance figure during WWII, and then returned to Italy after the war to serve in Parliament for the Socialist Party.

His "novel", a thinly fictional account of his experiences as an junior officer with the Sassari brigade, was originally published in 1939. It really isn't a novel per se, it's more of a straightforward diary of part of his tour of duty in the Alps. In simple prose, he recounts the daily drudgery and duties of life on the front lines. As with many war books, most time is spent waiting, standing to, and then standing down. And as with many descriptions of other WWI fronts, the combat is so insane it's almost parody. Italian commanders proved to be no less tactically and strategically foolish as their counterparts elsewhere, ordering one doomed assault after another. The most interesting part appears late in the book, when parts of his brigade mutiny and refuse to fight any further. Other than that, the book is more or less a litany of fellow officers getting killed, foolish senior officers getting drunk and obstinate, bitter resignation to duty in the face of such madness, artillery delivering friendly fire, and semi-serious talk of engineering "accidents" (the kind involving stray bullets) for overzealous commanders.

While we should be grateful for Lussu's account, it ultimately doesn't offer a great deal of new perspective on the war other than the Italian army managed to mimic the foolishness of the other great powers. Those interesting in a quite entertaining fictional account of the Austro-Hungarian front should track down John Biggins' excellent series of books about the exploits of Otto Prohaska, starting with "A Sailor of Austria".

Kagaramar
This book is mind-blowing. There is not a huge number of personal accounts of WWI from the trenches, and this one is among the most horrifying ones. The folly of the command and the brutality of his surroundings is almost beyond belief. "Storm of Steel" is also similarly hair raising.

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