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Fiction, Literature

The Werewolf of Paris epub ebook

by Guy Endore

The Werewolf of Paris epub ebook

Author: Guy Endore
Category: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Lightyear Pr (September 1, 2007)
ISBN: 0899684254
ISBN13: 978-0899684253
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 217
Other formats: docx txt lit mobi


The Werewolf of Paris (1933) is a horror novel as well as a work of historical fiction by American writer Guy Endore.

The Werewolf of Paris (1933) is a horror novel as well as a work of historical fiction by American writer Guy Endore. The novel follows Bertrand Caillet, the eponymous werewolf, throughout the tumultuous events of the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune of 1870–71. Like much Gothic fiction, The Werewolf of Paris opens with a frame story in which the author explains his struggle with the fantastic elements of his tale

GUY ENDORE A NOVEL PEGASUS CRIME NEW YORK LONDON These creatures live onlely without meats; The . Unto which may be added the Dormouse, which lives partly by sleep, And the Werewolf, whose food is night, winter and death.

GUY ENDORE A NOVEL PEGASUS CRIME NEW YORK LONDON These creatures live onlely without meats; The Camelion by the Air, The Want or Mole, by the Earth, The Sea-Herring by th.

Guy Endore’s novel is actually THE best werewolf origin story ever written in my opinion. This the Werewolf of Paris is a classic a beautiful book that deserves so much better then the slap-dash way it was transfered to electronic copy. The subtlety of the subject matter, the symbolism, and the historical backdrop of events all kindle the imagination in ways contemporary horror novels do not. I felt at times I was reading Victor Hugo’s ‘Les Miserables’ with a supernatural creature included for good measure.

Endore's classic werewolf novel - now back in paperback for the first time in over forty years - helped define a genre and set a. .

Endore's classic werewolf novel - now back in paperback for the first time in over forty years - helped define a genre and set a new standard in horror fiction. The werewolf is one of the great iconic figures of horror in folklore. First published in 1933, Guy Endore’s The Werewolf of Paris may finally be coming into its own. Like those other horror classics, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, this notorious novel doesn’t just aim for raw s gruesomeness. Perhaps its closest analogue may actually be still another classic about the savage demons inside us all, Robert Louis Stevenson’s D. ekyll and Mr. Hyde.

And they continued to cling to each other with all the despair of drowning people. Their souls were too weak to have a tight grasp on their bodies, and it was as if, knowing how soon death was to rob them of this delightful housing of flesh which protected the weak flame of their spirit, it was as if knowing that this life must be brief, no matter how long it lasts, for anything which must come to.

Endore’s classic werewolf novel-now back in print for the first time in over forty years-helped define a genre and set .

Endore’s classic werewolf novel-now back in print for the first time in over forty years-helped define a genre and set a new standard in horror fiction The werewolf is one of the great iconic figures of horror in folklore, legend, film, and literature. And connoisseurs of horror fiction know that The Werewolf of Paris is a cornerstone work, a masterpiece of the genre that deservedly ranks with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.

The Werewolf of Paris book. Had Guy Endore only wanted to write a werewolf story with masochistic maidens and grisly graveyard feasts, The Werewolf of Paris would be half its actual length, but in fact it’s much more. The theme of this novel is homo homini lupus ~ man’s inhumanity to man. Literally, man is a wolf to man.

The Werewolf of Paris: A Novel,’ by Guy Endore. However you interpret the rich ambiguities of The Werewolf of Paris, the book invokes the emotions we associate with tragedy: terror and pity. But Endore stresses how much we are all the playthings of dark impulses beyond our understanding. The insidiousness lies in the pleasure we find in surrendering to those impulses. For, it would seem, only when we let loose the beast within do we experience a secretly longed-for ecstasy.

In a work that strives to do for werewolves what Stoker's Dracula did for vampires, Endore's werewolf, an outcast named Bertrand Caillet, travels round seeking to calm the beast within. An episodic tale, the story wanders through 19th Century France and into hotspots like the Franco-Prussian war. Stunning in its sexual frankness and eerie, fog-enshrouded visions, this novel was decidedly influential for the generations of horror and science fiction authors who came after.

Reviews (7)
Iesha
This book starts off dead slow and takes time to build up steam. The first six chapters are used to build up a credible backstory to the origins of werewolves in this literary universe located in olden days Paris. I was originally put off by all this build up before you even heard hint of the first werewolf. This book uses amazing subtley to evolve rather than reveal the werewolf. In most books the werewolf is revealed as a fully formed creature with its lore already intact. In this book the werewolf evolves before you as you read. You sort of follow the evolution of the werewolf because; the reader goes behind closed doors where the villigers and others affected by the werewolves are not allowed.

This book writes foundational lore of lycantrophyand how people respond to it. The Werewolf of Paris is written as if it is the first real documented encounter with the Lycan species. The Werewolf of Paris let's yoou see the challenge of having a werewolf in the house that you both love and hate at differeht times. The Werewolf of Paris is more aptly named the day to day life and times of a lycanthrope. In so many ways this book, The Werewolf of Paris is like no werewolf book I've read before and I've read many hundreds of werewolf books many good others not so great. The Werewolf of Paris documents the struggles of any otherwise good kid, who wants to grow into a good man while being at times betrayed by his werewolf born passions, rages and desires.

I won't share even one spoiler with you in my review because; every word in this The Werewolf of Paris is golden. Every challenge faced every drop of blood spilled is part of a beautiful web. If I betrayed any of The Werewolf of Paris to you in a spoiler it would profoundly alter your reading pleasure. If you like books about werewolves then The Werewolf of Paris is simply a must read book. No true werewolf lover can go through life without reading The Werewolf of Paris because; yes it is that good. I first heard about the The Werewolf of Paris mentioned in the commentary on a hoor movie DVD I purchased from Amazon.com. The commentator stated that this The Werewolf of Paris book did for werewolf's what bram stoker's dracula did for vampires and he was right. I can see how The Werewolf of Paris put werewolves on the horror map.

Now lets get to the Kindle Edition of this The Werewolf of Paris book which is how I purchased and read it. Is the kindle version of this book bad yes it is but not by any means is it unreadable. This the Werewolf of Paris is a classic a beautiful book that deserves so much better then the slap-dash way it was transfered to electronic copy. Pages that run off into a kind of infinity that can only be found on an electronic device as if the RETURN line key had not been invented. the other extreme narrow bands of text mad difficult to read by a return key on steroids so long passages run a few words long per sentence. The Werewolf of Paris is such a great book to get such tacky treatment in its rendering into a Kindle E-Book. I however am happy because; my life has been made better by reading The Werewolf of Paris and the lousy Kindle translation did nothing to still my passion and love for each word in this totally awesome book. Was this Werewolf of Paris harder to read because of the less than fitting Kindle translation YES INDEED IT WAS NO DOUBT ABOUT IT!

I suggest that any true avid werewolf fan or man of the lycanthropic art would easily adapt to the kindles transfer failings because; this The Werewolf of Paris is a feast for the intellect fit for a King. This Werewolf of Paris earns my five stars gladly recorded here for the world to see

Vaua
First, the edition. The Kindle Edition publishers and Amazon should be ashamed for having let out such a horrific version to the public. Almost completely unformatted, the volume of spelling errors, typos, grammatical problems, etc. is so extreme that I actually had to stop reporting them. Before I stopped, I reported over 50, many of which made whole sentences totally incoherent. I know it's only $3 for a digital copy, but one staffer's reading this could have fixed a lot of problems. Example: The word "wifi" is where "will" should be a number of times. Given that the story takes place predominantly during the 19th century, wifi is unlikely. "Modem" also comes up in place of "modern." This problem is so rampant that I recommend the new print version to interested readers.

The book ranks somewhere in the 3 to 4 star range. I enjoyed it, though many of the complaints in other reviews are fair. It draws from a lot of historical events, and is much better if you are familiar with the Paris Commune. It is also disjointed, and at times I found myself wondering when the subject changed.

It is not terribly gory, though it is unsettling. While the murders might not shake you, the rape and incest will turn the stomachs of the even the most heartless reader. Despite the terrible actions of almost everyone involved, sympathies do build for many of the primary players, though figures introduced late in the book feel a bit hollow at times, and some of their actions, particularly Sophie's, are questionable given what the author offers about her.

Tuliancel
Pretty good yarn. Interesting concept: that horrendous, long duration punishment can be a causal factor in bringing forth werewolfian traits that become embodied and inheritable.

However, a practical impediment to enjoying this nice, scary book were the numerous typos that made parts of it all but unreadable in the Kindle version. Too often I had to stop and try to decipher exactly what word was meant, since the letters were so garbled. In some instances I just skipped the words entirely because I couldn't fathom what they were supposed to mean. All this hesitation naturally interrupted the flow of reading.

Other that the lousy transcription, it was an interesting book, particularly considering it was written in the early 30s, and there was language in it clearly foreshadowing the absolute barbarity of World War II and of the Nazis and Soviets in particular. These forecasts were even better than H.G. Wells's forecasts because they were specific and dead on.

caster
I first picked up this book in 1953, when I was nine. I couldn't manage the language, but I was able to read one scene that made such an impression that I recognized it during my reading of 2017! It's when the protagonist, transforming to a wolf, tears off his clothing and urunates on the ground. At nine, I found the scene shocking. I'd never r read a book in which someone "went to the bathroom.". I registered shock and something akin to titillation. The book is occasionally slow and gets away from the werewolf character too much, but it has a strong atmosphere of wildness and pain. Life is cruel and cheap. The Parisian lower classes are Dickensian mad animals. The principle female character is a masochist who lets the wolfman feed on her blood. In the insanity of the Commune, she becomes careless of her life and promiscuous. The tale ends in sadness and disaster, but watching the onrush of doom makes for a gripping read. It's clear that the story will end in great darkness, but the author has creative means of nonetheless creating suspense. It is good midwinter/midnight reading.

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