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Fiction, Literature

Savage Beloved (Savage (Leisure Paperback)) epub ebook

by Cassie Edwards

Savage Beloved (Savage (Leisure Paperback)) epub ebook

Author: Cassie Edwards
Category: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Dorchester Pub Co Inc (May 30, 2006)
Pages: 356 pages
ISBN: 0843952733
ISBN13: 978-0843952735
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 280
Other formats: rtf azw mobi lrf


Savage Dream (Savage Series). Cassie Edwards may be a popular writer, but with discerning audiences she needs to step up her game and flesh out the relationships and historical context of her stories.

Savage Dream (Savage Series). Savage Hope (Savage (Leisure Paperback)). One person found this helpful.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. i really enjoy this book. would recommend all of Cassie Edwards Savage series. the action and story line along with the sex scenes are so vivid you can see it clearly. Kidnapped from Fort Hope by Chief Two Eagles, Candy learns a new way of life. the withcha tribe are peaceful unlike the sioux who just like cause trouble.

Cassie Edwards has provided her most refreshing "Savage" tale in years as the lead couple has issues to deal with ratherĀ . I just finished this book, one of many from Cassie Edwards that I have read and frankly, I was disappointed.

Cassie Edwards has provided her most refreshing "Savage" tale in years as the lead couple has issues to deal with rather than the usual odious powerful white male causing trouble. The story line provides readers with a glimpse of Pacific Northwest Indian life in the latter half of the nineteenth century. While the story line was excellent, it seemed like it was written by an 8th grader.

When a fly started buzzing around the face of her son, her thoughts were averted to things other than romancing her beloved husband. She shooed the fly away from her child, whose tiny lips were contentedly suckling at her breast.

Author:Edwards, Cassie. Savage Beloved (Savage (Leisure Paperback)). We appreciate the impact a good book can have

Author:Edwards, Cassie. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. Savage Beloved by Cassie Edwards (Paperback, 2006). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Romance: Historical, Fiction, Fiction - Romance, Romance - Historical, Romance - General. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Series of standalone novels by Cassie Edwards about Native Americans on the frontier finding love Savage Illusion (Savage, Savage Spirit (Savage,

Series of standalone novels by Cassie Edwards about Native Americans on the frontier finding love Savage Illusion (Savage, Savage Spirit (Savage, Series of standalone novels by Cassie Edwards about Native Americans on the frontier finding love.

Kidnapped from Fort Hope by Chief Two Eagles, Candy learns a new way of life. Book in the Savage Series). Select Format: Hardcover.

Savage Bliss - by Cassie Edwards. Cassie Edwards a Mattoon Illinois author. What others are saying. Beloved Highlander by Sara Bennett +++. Cover Critique: Romance Cover Categories Part 3. harlequin and romance.

Surviving a bloody massacre only to be captured by a vengeful Wichita chief named Two Eagles, Candy soon learns the ways of his people and discovers, at his hands, a passion unlike any she has ever known. Original.
Reviews (7)
GoodBuyMyFriends
It's a good story, for the most part. The heroine is sweet and kind. The hero is attractive and powerful. But... I found myself befuddled when the hero finds out truly (once again) how sweet and kind the heroine is, he rushes off and "rescues" her from working in the field and removes the manacles He put on her as punishment for treatment to his elderly uncle- and then proceeds to proclaim his love! What the heck happened between the racial tensions, there's absolutely No language barrier (and no explanation as to why), and the hero's hate and discontent about getting revenge becomes suddenly moot because he finally feels he can love his captive. And the heroine, while mildly likeable, is in love with him too! I have no idea why the heroine loves this guy. There was no build up to the romantic overtures, nor any helpful explanations as to why the Indians do speak English (and perfect English no less, how wonderful). It's an enjoyable read because you Want to like the characters and story, but can't make that jump because the gap is too wide and the bridge too narrow. Cassie Edwards may be a popular writer, but with discerning audiences she needs to step up her game and flesh out the relationships and historical context of her stories.

Mullador
Quality Book! A+

Forcestalker
i really enjoy this book. would recommend all of Cassie Edwards Savage series . the action and story line along with the sex scenes are so vivid you can see it clearly .the withcha tribe are peaceful unlike the sioux who just like cause trouble .

Ballardana
excellent

Tujar
Loved it and will have to order more in the future

Malarad
Bought this for my shut-in friend.

INvait
I understand it's used, but the package itself seemed as if at the corner something had mauled it. Otherwise it came out pretty great, thank you so much.

I'm not going to go too deeply into the story because I read this a year or so ago and found it pretty bad with definite racist overtones. What made me want to post a review now is that a blogger found these really strikingly similar passages from SAVAGE BELOVED and several reference books. Read them yourself and make your own call, but for me, I'm convinced enough to boycott Edwards totally. I know lots of authors don't pay any attention to their reviews on Amazon, but if Edwards does, I'd love to hear her side of the story on this.

(By the way, these were just from the top of the list of passages. There were many, many more instances that wouldn't fit in this review. These came from Sarah and Candy at the SBTB blog, for proper attribution.)

SAVAGE BELOVED
Published by Leisure Books, May 2006
ISBN: 0843952733
Page 84

"There is an ancient legend telling that when the plants fail to come up, the Wichita people will cease to exist."
[...]
"When the first shoot of corn comes up, an old woman goes there to perform a rite of thanksgiving over the plant," he said. "She rubs the plant with her hands in blessing, saying, `Oh, big bow,' which means corn stalk. Then she rubs a baby with her hands in a similar fashion, passing on the blessing from the plant to the child."

He paused, smiled at Candy, then said, "Everyone is happy at the sight of the first plant."

CADDOAN TEXTS PAWNEE, SOUTH BAND DIALECT by Gene Weltfish
Page 39

When the first shoot comes up an old woman goes there to perform a rite of thanksgiving over the plant. She rubs the plant with her hands in blessing, saying, "Oh, big bow." Then directly she rubs the baby with her hands in a similar manner, passing on the blessing from the plant to the child. Everyone is happy at the sight of the first plant. There is an ancient legend that states that when the plants fail to come up, we will all cease to exist.

SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 122

At one side she saw a bed with a mattress made of slender willow rods and coverings of buffalo hide.
Hanging down in front of the bed was a long curtain of buffalo hide, which she could tell could be raised or lowered at will. The half-lowered hide seemed to be painted with war scenes.

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 5

The beds consist of mattresses made of slender willow rods and coverings of buffalo hide. Over the bed and hanging down in front, is a long curtain of buffalo hide, which can be raised or lowered at will; this is often painted with war scenes.

SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 172

"The tattoo on my right arm, that mark in the form of a small cross, is a symbol of the stars and represents a well-known mythical hero among the Wichita. He is called Flint-Stone-Lying-Down-Above, which in my language is spoken as Tahanetsicihadidia, the guardian of the warriors.

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 2

On the back of each hand is tattooed a small design resembling the bird's foot. This is made immediately after the boy has killed his first bird. Up and down the arms and across the breast may be found additional marks in the form of a small cross. [...] These crosses are symbols of the stars and represent a well-known mythical hero among the Wichita called "Flint-Stone-Lying-Down-Above" (Tahanetskihadidia), who, as is told in one of the myths, is one of the guardians of the warriors.

SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 175

"Three concentric circles are tattooed around one nipple of each Wichita woman. These concentric rings prevent the women's breasts from becoming pendulous in old age."

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 3

The nipple is also tattooed, and around it are three concentric circles. [...] They are also told that the concentric rings about the breasts prevent them from becoming pendulous in old age.

SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 179

"For it is now the Moon of the Strawberries, when bears are seeking green sedges, or roots, anthills, and berries, and when buffalo sharpen and polish their horns for bloody contests among themselves."

INDIAN BOYHOOD by Dr. Charles Alexander Eastman
Page 54

"I was once an interested and unseen spectator of a contest between a pair of grizzly bears and three buffaloes--a rash act for the bears, for it was in the moon of strawberries, when the buffaloes sharpen and polish their horns for bloody contests among themselves."

SAVAGE BELOVED by Cassie Edwards
Page 180

"Four of them represent the four world quarters, or gods, while the upward peak is symbolic of Man-Never-Known-On-Earth, or Kinnekasus, the Creator."

He gestured toward the entranceway. "And the door of all homes of my people is placed on the east side so that the sun may look into the lodge as it rises, while the small circular opening overhead is placed there not only for smoke to escape through, but also so that the sun may look into the lodge at noon, and at night, the star gods are thought to pour down their strength into our homes."

He then gestured toward the fire pit. "The fire's place in all my people's lodges is considered sacred," he said. "There offerings are made, food is cooked, and medicine is heated."

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 5

The four projecting poles outside stand for the four world quarters or gods, while the upward peak is symbolic of Man-Never-Known-on-Earth (Kinnekasus), the Creator in Wichita mythology. It is said that a door is placed on the east side that the sun may look into the lodge as it rises, and that the west door is so placed that the sun may look in as it sets, while through the small circular opening overhead the sun may look in at noon. The south door is still retained that the god of the south wind may enter. The fireplace is considered sacred, for here offerings are made, the food is cooked, medicines heated, etc.

SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 213-214

Each was emptying her bag, dumping the corn into one big heap. The pile soon became so high that it looked as if wagons had been used to haul it instead of the simple carrying bags.
"The next step is to build a long, narrow ditch with mud embankments along each side against which to lean the corn," Two Eagles explained.
[...]
"They will build a big fire and throw the ears into it," Two Eagles said. "The women will take turns reaching their hands in and out of the flames to turn the ears over. They are skilled at doing this, and no one ever burns herself. When the wood burns down, the naked ears are left to roast in the coals. Sometimes the ears roast all night, as this gives them a delicious flavor, but today the women will just leave the corn in until the sun begins lowering in the sky. Then whatever husks remain on the corn will be removed and the women will proceed to cut the kernels from the cobs. For this purpose they will use a clam shell, but kernels from small-grained ears are removed with a knife."
[...]
Candy saw some of the women spreading large hide covers over the ground, then pegging them down tight until they were smooth.
[...]
"The kernels of the roasted corn will be spread out there," he said. "The blue corn will be separated into three groups by size, small medium, and large. Then they will be winnowed and put into sacks made of tanned hide. After each sack is full, the women will beat upon it with a long stick to make sure that the grains are settled compactly into the bag. They will place a lid inside the bag and pull the drawstring closed. After all the bags are filled, there will be a big pile of them."

CADDOAN TEXTS PAWNEE, SOUTH BAND DIALECT by Gene Weltfish
Page 40

Then they would dump them into one big heap. The pile would be so high that it looked as if wagons had been used to do the hauling instead of the simple carrying bags. The next step was to build a long narrow ditch with mud embankments along each side against which to lean the corn.

Then they would build a big fire and throw the ears of corn into it. One would have to stick one's hand in and out of the flame repeatedly to turn the ears over, but one would never burn oneself. When the wood has burned down the naked ears are roasted in the coals. The corn would be left to roast all night as this gives it a delicious flavor.

Kernels from small-grained ears were removed with a knife. Large hide covers were then spread out upon the ground and pegged down tight so that they would be very smooth and upon these the kernels were spread out to dry.

When the kernels were dry they were winnowed and put into sacks made of tanned hide. After each sack was full they would beat upon it with a long stick to make sure the grains settled compactly into the bag. Then they would place a lid inside the bag [...] pull the drawstring. After we had filled them there would be a big pile of bags.

SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 220

Still in their pods, the beans had been spread out upon a hide pegged to the ground. When the beans had dried, they were beaten with a stick to release them from the pods. Finally the beans were winnowed and then packed in bags.
[...]
The first step was to peel the pumpkins. Then some were cut spirally into strips from top to bottom, while others were cut into rings and hung on a cross-pole to dry.

After the whole pumpkin had been stripped, there was a disc left at the bottom, which was known as the "Sitting One." The pumpkin pieces were then left to dry for about a day. Afterward, the women gathered again to complete the process. The pumpkin strips were braided and formed into mats, which were left out in the sun to dry.

CADDOAN TEXTS PAWNEE, SOUTH BAND DIALECT by Gene Weltfish
Pages 40-41

The beans in their pods would be spread out upon a hide which was pegged to the ground and when they were dry would be beaten with a stick to release them from the pods.
[...]
The first step was to peel the pumpkins. Then if it is decided that braided pumpkin mats are to be made, the pumpkins are cut spirally into strips from top to bottom. Other pumpkins are cut into rings and hung on a cross pole to dry. After the whole pumpkin has been stripped there is left a disc at the bottom which is known as "Sitting-one." The pumpkin is then left to dry for about a day when it is in the proper stage for braiding and for the stringing of the bottom discs. After they are braided, the pumpkin mats are left out in the sun to dry.

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