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Fiction, Literature

Reflex epub ebook

by Dick Francis

Reflex epub ebook

Author: Dick Francis
Category: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: Pan Books (2007)
ISBN: 0330450387
ISBN13: 978-0330450386
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 811
Other formats: lit doc mbr azw


This is a fairly typical Dick Francis novel and readers of the series will immediately recognize Philip Nore as the prototypical Francis protagonist. It's a good book, although not among Francis's best.

Longtime jockey Philip Nore suspects that a racetrack photographer's fatal. This is a fairly typical Dick Francis novel and readers of the series will immediately recognize Philip Nore as the prototypical Francis protagonist. In part this is because he spends a great deal of time in the novel describing the technical aspects of what Nore is doing in his darkroom to uncover Millace's secrets.

Like all Francis’ titles, Reflex’’ includes several meanings I have long enjoyed the Dick Francis books.

Like all Francis’ titles, Reflex’’ includes several meanings. I hadn’t known I was going to say what I had. It had just forced its own way out, like water through a new spring. ’ ‘Just a reflex’ not a planned choice. All those races I’d thrown away in the past, not liking it, but doing i. .I have long enjoyed the Dick Francis books. They were unique in that they dealt with horse racing, a trade unfamiliar to many, and they featured many different protagonists, not a single individual. Mr. Francis was himself a jockey, so his stories have always felt comfortably authentic.

A JOVE Book, published by arrangement with the author. This book may not be reproduced in whole or part, by mimeograph or any other means, without permission. For information address: The Berkley Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Putnam Inc.

I would have been more than happy never to have come into his focus, but as I was passing one of the reporters shot out a hand and fastened it on my arm. Philip, he said, you can tell us. You’re always on the business end of a camera

I would have been more than happy never to have come into his focus, but as I was passing one of the reporters shot out a hand and fastened it on my arm. You’re always on the business end of a camera. No, Philip, he said, exasperated.

Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and . Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys

Dick Francis's fiction has a secret ingredient - his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader's attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end' Sunday Telegraph. the entire story is a pleasure to relish' Scotsman. Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National.

Richard Stanley Francis CBE FRSL (31 October 1920 – 14 February 2010) was a British crime writer, and former steeplechase jockey, whose novels centre on horse racing in England. After wartime service in the RAF, Francis became a full-time jump-jockey, winning over 350 races and becoming champion jockey of the British National Hunt.

Reflex was written by Dick Francis in 1980. It won the Edgar Allen Poe Mystery Prize for 1981. The book tells the mystery about the photographer George Millace who died in a car crash. Philip Nore has been riding horses for many years and he always wants to win. But sometimes he is told to lose, he doesn't like this and he never takes money for losing.

Items related to Reflex (A Dick Francis Novel). Francis, Dick Reflex (A Dick Francis Novel)

Items related to Reflex (A Dick Francis Novel). Francis, Dick Reflex (A Dick Francis Novel). ISBN 13: 9780425206959. Reflex (A Dick Francis Novel).

Dick Francis was born in South Wales in 1920. He was a young rider of distinction winning awards and trophies at horse shows throughout the United Kingdom

Dick Francis was born in South Wales in 1920. He was a young rider of distinction winning awards and trophies at horse shows throughout the United Kingdom. At the outbreak of World War II he joined the Royal Air Force as a pilot, flying fighter and bomber aircraft including the Spitfire and Lancaster. He became one of the most successful postwar steeplechase jockeys, winning more than 350 races and riding for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.

A jockey unravels nasty secrets of corruption, blackmail, and murder in this mystery from grand master of crime fiction Dick Francis. Longtime jockey Philip Nore is no hero. But when he begins to suspect that a racetrack photographer’s fatal accident was really murder, he sets out to discover the truth and trap the killer. Slowly, he unravels some nasty secrets of corruption, blackmail and murder-and unwittingly sets himself up as the killer’s next target. Reflex enthralls.

Reviews (7)
Jugami
Like all Francis’ titles, “Reflex’’ includes several meanings. One is Philip’s defiantly refusing to lose horse race to order . . .

“It was ironic. I hadn’t known I was going to say what I had. It had just forced its own way out, like water through a new spring.’’

‘Just a reflex’ not a planned choice.

“All those races I’d thrown away in the past, not liking it, but doing it . . . Why was it so different now? Why was the revulsion so strong now that I didn’t think I could do a Daylight again, even if to refuse meant virtually the end of being a jockey?’’

These questions: Why now? Where did this revulsion come from? Are never really answered. Just a psychological, heart-felt ‘reflex’. Reflexes do not have explanations.

“When had I changed . . . and how could it have happened without my noticing? I didn’t know. I just had a sense of having already traveled too far to turn back. Too far down a road where I didn’t want to go.’’

‘Where I did not want’. Who of us hasn’t been on that road? In fact . . .

“I understood why I was as I was. I knew why I just drifted along, going where the tide took me. I knew why I was passive, but I felt absolutely no desire to change things, to stamp about and insist on being the master of my own fate.’’

This is so . . . so . . . curious. Why? Because Francis books are exactly about that person: ‘master of his own fate’!

“I didn’t want to look for my half-sister, and I didn’t want to lose my job with Harold. I could simply drift along as usual doing nothing very positive . . . and yet for some obscure reason that instinctive course was seeming increasingly unattractive.’’

This actually pretty subtle. Like Pascal said - ‘The heart has reasons the heart does not know’.

But, as usual, Francis uses a concrete, physical illustration of the mental, moral drama. In this case, it is the photographic ‘reflexion’ of reality, people. Philip obsessed with photography . . .

““You never go anywhere without a camera, do you?” he said.
“Just like Dad.”
“I suppose not.”
“Dad said he felt naked without one.”
“It gets to be part of you.” I shut the trunk and locked it from long habit.
“It’s your shield. Keeps you a step away from the world. Makes you an observer. Gives you an excuse not to feel.”
“He looked extremely surprised that I should think such things, and so was I surprised, not that I’d thought them, but that I should have said them to him. I smiled to take the serious truth away and leave only an impression of satire, and Steve, photographer’s son, looked relieved.’’

This type of psychological/philosophical insight sets Francis apart. Clear, simple, vivid and fascinating!

Wonderful!

Another ‘reflex’ - both photographical and emotional . . .

“It contained a photograph I’d taken once of George. George holding his camera, looking towards me, smiling his familiar sardonic smile. George in color. George in a typically George-like pose, one leg forward with his weight back on the other, head back, considering the world a bad joke. George as he’d lived.’’

This picture a vivid ‘reflection’ of George.

“There and then in full public view Marie Millace flung her arms round me and hugged me as if she would never let go, and I could feel her tears trickling down my neck.

Her tears just an unplanned ‘reflex’.

Francis writing is a wonder.

Sad he is gone.

Gerceytone
I have long enjoyed the Dick Francis books. They were unique in that they dealt with horse racing, a trade unfamiliar to many, and they featured many different protagonists, not a single individual. Mr. Francis was himself a jockey, so his stories have always felt comfortably authentic. He died several years ago (2010) so the books currently on the shelves are all re-issues.

“Reflex” was probably written near the end of his own active racing days. His hero here is named Philip Nore, a jockey who is also beginning to age. He is still in good physical shape but is beginning to consider retirement from the daily rough-and-tumble of his profession. The story is therefore less about racing than about Philip’s personal goals. When we meet him, he is still a working jockey but has become a skilled photographic hobbyist as well. Through a fellow rider whose father is also a photographer he comes into possession of the older man’s discard collection when the latter dies unexpectedly. It appears to consist of mostly blank pieces of plastic and paper, but it is packaged very carefully and set apart. Philip, out of curiosity and to pursue some suspicions of his own, sets out to develop, literally, any material hidden therein. Sure enough, after a couple of chapters devoted to exotic darkroom maneuvers, the scraps yield up their secrets. Blackmail material, lots of it. (On his acknowledgement page Mr. Francis gives credit to the individuals “who made me the puzzles”.) The result is that Philip is able to destroy a menacing and violent drug distribution network that has come to be knitted into his racing world and incidentally to clear up some mysteries surrounding his own origins.

This is a straightforward suspense story, but one in which minor characters are given real dimensions. One is a young solicitor who acts as a liaison between Philip and his gorgon of a grandmother. He should only be a part of the scenery, but Mr. Francis endows him with moments of vitality which pull him unequivocally off the page. The grandmother too is saved from being a stereotype by little, telling touches: she is thoroughly unlikeable, but she is undeniably alive. These are features found in Mr. Francis’ other works and I think they will keep him in circulation for many years to come.

Rrinel
I love Dick Francis mysteries. They are well planned with a strong hero. I also love the fact that the mystery is not always a murder. For me. Murders are unnecessary. Missing diamonds, horses dying, and frustrations solved make better stories. He writes about embezzlement, stolen whiskey, and of course, Crooked trainers. Most of his books have horse racing as part of the background.
I have been buying them again on kindle when I need a good read. I can carry a selection with me where ever I am. I would really like to buy High Stakes on kindle. It is one of my favorites.

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