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Fiction, Literature

THE ENGLISH PATIENT epub ebook

by Michael Ondaatje

THE ENGLISH PATIENT epub ebook

Author: Michael Ondaatje
Category: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: PICADOR; Later Printing edition (1993)
Pages: 320 pages
ISBN: 0330327542
ISBN13: 978-0330327541
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 244
Other formats: lrf lit azw lrf


The book lay on her lap. She realized that for more than five minutes she had been looking at the porousness of the paper . She sat in the window alcove in the English patient’s. room, the painted walls on one side of her, the valley on the other.

The book lay on her lap. She realized that for more than five minutes she had been looking at the porousness of the paper, the crease at the corner of page 17 which someone had folded over as a mark. She brushed h. er hand over its skin. A scurry in her mind like a mouse in the ceiling, a moth on the night window. She looked down the hall, though there was no one else living there now, no one except the English patient and herself in the Villa San Girolamo.

Читатель знакомится с главными героями в итальянской провинции весной 1945 года. На заброшенной вилле недалеко от Флоренции пересекаются жизненные пути четырёх людей - медсестры из передвижного госпиталя, её умирающего пациента, сапёра, разминирующего окрестности, и бывшего вора, завербованного английской разведкой. Для широкого круга изучающих английский язык. Текст сокращён и адаптирован. Уровень Intermediate.

The English Patient is a 1992 novel by Michael Ondaatje. The book follows four dissimilar people brought together at an Italian villa during the Italian Campaign of World War II. The four main characters are: an unrecognisably burned man - the eponymous patient, presumed to be English; his Canadian Army nurse, a Sikh British Army sapper, and a Canadian thief.

I have never read a book that has captivated me in the way that ‘The English Patient’ has. It focuses the reader on the story of five key people from different origins, four of whom the fates of war were sheltering at the end of the Second World War in a ravaged Italian villa with a personality of its own.

461 quotes from Michael Ondaatje: 'She had always wanted words, she loved them; grew up on them. Words gave her clarity, brought reason, shape

461 quotes from Michael Ondaatje: 'She had always wanted words, she loved them; grew up on them. Words gave her clarity, brought reason, shape. 'We die containing a richness of lovers and tribes, tastes we have swallowed, bodies we have plunged into and swum up as if rivers of wisdom, characters we have climbed into as if trees, fears we have hidden in as if caves. I wish for all this to be marked on by body when I am dead. I believe in such cartography - to be marked by nature, not just to label ourselves on a map like the names of rich men and women on buildings.

The English Patient author Michael Ondaatje is among six writers in the running for the £25,000 Walter Scott Prize for historical fiction. In July, Ondaatje’s 1992 book The English Patient was named the greatest-ever winner of the Man Booker Prize. The English Patient author Michael Ondaatje is among six writers in the running for the £25,000 Walter Scott Prize for historical fiction. com. ae8-2565c9. Posted by the author's publisher).

MICHAEL ONDAATJE is the author of five novels, a memoir, a non-fiction book on film and several books of poetry. His novel The English Patient won the Booker Prize; another of his novels, Anil’s Ghost, won the Irish Times International Fiction Prize and the Prix Medicis. His most recent novel, Divisadero, was shortlisted for the Giller Prize, the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and was the winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction 2007.

Spine creased, page edges tanned. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.
Reviews (7)
Iphonedivorced
But worthwhile, I think. I saw the movie years ago and I read the book now because I am about to watch the movie again. I remember the movie being beautifully filmed and I loved the score, but I left the theatre feeling confused. As I implied in the title, this is not an easy book to read: to puzzle out. At the end, nothing is as it appeared at the beginning. How anybody makes the book into a movie is beyond me.
But if the book is difficult to read and understand, it is beautifully written. The language is lyrical. At the end of WWII, a young woman, a nurse, winds up living with three men in a bombed out wreck of an Italian Villa. One is The English Patient, hideously burned in a plane crash in Libya, and supposed to be dying. The other three are also victims of the war, although their wounds might be more difficult to see. The interactions of these four damaged survivors are woven into a tapestry as the novel unfolds, beautiful but, at the end, still difficult to comprehend.

Skrimpak
The movie and book are two different animals and they are both masterpieces and can both stand on their own.
The book is presented in three story-lines, independent and intersecting at the same time. That much character development would not have made a good movie.
The story lines of Hana, Kip and Caravaggio are as unique and interesting as that of the English patient whose story brings them all together and intersect. While the Drama of each of their lives could be a story in itself and the specificity of the English patient, strangely, is not even needed to for they story arch...it could have been other things...but the saga of the English patient and the mystery of his life and identity interweaves and drives their more mundane life struggles. It's story, story, story and the English patient's narrative is a powerful driver.

Missing or short-changed in the movie are the deeper story of Hana dealing with the trauma of her father's death, Kip's story of trying to navigate the fallout of colonialism, assimilation, identity and the east-west divide, and Caravaggio's (who's character, along with Hana first appear in a previous book " "In the Skin of a Lion"-they really did grow up together in Canada) who relationship with Hana is infused with tenderness but is confusing to Hana because of unresolved family relationships she is still sorting out...and sought out Hana in Italy (not the English patient-but there are connections there they turn up).

Don't skip the book...it is a good read with characters of depth that you don't often encounter.

OwerSpeed
I was delightfully introduced to the world of The English Patient gradually, over an extended period, first in 1996 by being drawn into the story’s richness by Anthony Minghella’s beautiful film and screenplay in the theaters and then again in 2004 when I listened to the author's mellow voice, reading selections of his novel for the Collector’s Series DVD Bonus Material; the sound of his prose simply mesmerized me. I had read ‘The English Patient’ and other Ondaatje stories previously and I'd seen the film several times but Pico Iyer’s vivid Introduction in this Everyman’s Library Edition of 2011 boldly welcomed me back into the depth and the beauty of the author’s words.

I have never read a book that has captivated me in the way that ‘The English Patient’ has. It focuses the reader on the story of five key people from different origins, four of whom the fates of war were sheltering at the end of the Second World War in a ravaged Italian villa with a personality of its own. The tales began early enough to clearly define the origins of these characters and the formation of their values and beliefs. While our period of experience covers no more than a few years, Ondaatje’s introduction to these people is simultaneously both continuous and instantaneous. I could fully feel the hearts and souls of each of these characters at every moment as they lived, felt, loved and evolved around each other. The depth and richness that he infused in each of these characters pulled them together while he shaped them to stand alone on their own merits. While mystery and love surrounded the English patient’s origins, I completely understood his complexities along with those of Hana, Kip and Caravaggio. While Katharine created the source for Almásy’s ferocious passion, Ondaatje’s beautiful style let me feel every moment and emotion of their love, making it both a wonderful and a most enriching experience.

Nature, humanity, war and sensation were also characters that we learned to understand through the precise palate of Ondaatje's prose; you burn with their passion, you smell the villa breathing, the desert vastness overwhelms you, the undetonated bomb is alive, it's Africa, it's antiquity, it's timeless Europe, it's the 1940s, you are living in war, you are there.

Bob Magnant is the author of The Last Transition..., a fact-based novel about Iran. He writes about politics, globalization, the Internet and US policy in the Middle East...

Raelin
This is just about my favorite book ever. The writing is alchemy. Every would-be writer should read it before even thinking about writing themselves. There are not many books that make you want to start again the moment you read the last words on the page, but I think I have done that twice in my life with this novel. I read this book once a year. It's simply perfect.

Preve
A truly amazing book. I don't know what to say about it. The narrative voice is omniscient and excellent, though somewhat mannered. The writing style is stunning. Set in a bombed Italian villa, it's about a nurse, a burn patient, a sapper (bomb disarmer), and a thief/spy. It begins near the end of the European part of WWII, but reaching back in time, and going on just passed the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It's an intertwined spy story and multiple-thread love story. But more than that, it's a story of personal life versus war. Characterization is deeply intelligent. It did have flaws. The time line was confusing. The sensuality was over-written. The change of pronouns' antecedent was often confusing, although there was usually a page break to signal a change was a possibility.

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