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Fiction, Literature

Kinds of Love epub ebook

by May Sarton

Kinds of Love epub ebook

Author: May Sarton
Category: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reissue edition (February 17, 1994)
Pages: 464 pages
ISBN: 0393311015
ISBN13: 978-0393311013
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 576
Other formats: txt docx mobi lrf


Christina Chapman and her husband Cornelius, both past seventy, are. May Sarton's Willard is a small town in the rocky hills of New Hampshire, a place that attracts "the Christina Chapman and her husband Cornelius, both past seventy, are "summer people"-people who come to rural New England for the summer months and go home to the city when the cold weather comes. This year, however, Christina and Cornelius have decided to stay on. May Sarton's Willard is a small town in the rocky hills of New Hampshire, a place that attracts "the untameable, the wild, the gentle.

May Sarton (1912–1995) was born on May 3 in Wondelgem, Belgium, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her first volume of poetry, Encounters in April, was published in 1937 and her first novel, The Single Hound, in 1938. Her novels A Shower of Summer Days, The Birth of a Grandfather, and Faithful Are the Wounds, as well as her poetry collection In Time Like Air, all received nominations for the National Book Award. An accomplished memoirist, Sarton came out as a lesbian in her 1965 book Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing

Spending their first winter away from the city, an aging married couple finds renewed friendship and love in the New Hampshire hills Christina and Cornelius Chapman have spent their summers in Willard for years, shunning the city’s hottest months in favor of New Hampshire’s rocky, rolling hills. In Willard, Christina looks forward to spending time with Ellen, enjoying forest walks and the easy conversation that come with longstanding friendship.

Kinds of love; a novel. by. Sarton, May, 1912-1995. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on May 10, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Since I had enjoyed other books by May Sarton, I decided to keep this volume until I had read Kinds of Love. I was nearly halfway through when I discovered a note I had written in the margin

Since I had enjoyed other books by May Sarton, I decided to keep this volume until I had read Kinds of Love. I was nearly halfway through when I discovered a note I had written in the margin. This note told me I had read the book for the first time about 25 years ago. I don't remember finding typos or subject/verb disagreement in other books by this author, but I found one of each in this book.

Beautifully written and warmly rendered, Kinds of Love is a heartfelt portrait of marriage, friendship, class, and aging set against a tranquil, small-town New Hampshire backdrop.

May Sarton is the pen name of Eleanore Marie Sarton (May 3, 1912 – July 16, 1995), a prolific American poet, novelist and memoirist. She is considered an important contemporary figure in American literature, as well as a "poet's poet", and is lauded by literary and feminist critics for her works addressing themes in gender, sexuality, and universality

Sarton is an excellent nature writer and her descriptions of rural Willard throughout the different seasons are excellent.

Sarton is an excellent nature writer and her descriptions of rural Willard throughout the different seasons are excellent. Christina feels at the end of the book that by living permanently in Willard "I am close to my real feeling now," and that she and Cornelius have come into their own. A very appealing and uplifting story.

May Sarton ranks with the very best of our distinguished novelists. A Shower of Summer Days establishes once and for all her unmistakable authority. The New York Times The Irish estate home Dene's Court has been empty for years-its icy visage, shuttered windows, and overgrown tennis court are a burden for its caretakers and a curiosity for the nearby townspeople. May Sarton charts her second act in Maine in this graceful elegy about life, love, work, and growing older When May Sarton uprooted her life after fifteen years in the refurbished New Hampshire house with the garden she tended so lovingly, she relied solely on instinct.

May Sarton's Willard is a small town in the rocky hills of New Hampshire, a place that attracts "the untameable, the wild, the gentle. As Sarton takes us into the lives of the people who live there, we encounter a rich tapestry of characters and relationships. In the center are the deep, prickly friendship between Christina, an old Bostonian, and Ellen, the daughter of a farmer, and the unfolding process by which Christina and her husband "come into their own" in their marriage and become winter people at last.

Friendship, marriage, and intertwined lives in a small New Hampshire town.

Christina Chapman and her husband Cornelius, both past seventy, are "summer people"―people who come to rural New England for the summer months and go home to the city when the cold weather comes. This year, however, Christina and Cornelius have decided to stay on. May Sarton's Willard is a small town in the rocky hills of New Hampshire, a place that attracts "the untameable, the wild, the gentle." As Sarton takes us into the lives of the people who live there, we encounter a rich tapestry of characters and relationships. In the center are the deep, prickly friendship between Christina, an old Bostonian, and Ellen, the daughter of a farmer, and the unfolding process by which Christina and her husband "come into their own" in their marriage and become winter people at last.
Reviews (7)
Soustil
I have enjoyed May Sarton's journals very much and wondered whether this novel would resonate with me as well. Although I got tears in my eyes a couple of times, I didn't have a good cry and I didn't laugh, but I found myself very content to be in Willard, the small town which has been considered a vacation town and where Cornelius and Christina have decided to stay full-time in their old age as an experiment. Sarton wrote a journal called After the Stroke and this book could be called After Cornelius' Stroke. Parts of it are Christina's journal. I enjoyed this book because it encompasses many different feelings and stages in life--the mellowness of an aging marriage, the conflict of man versus nature, the tenderness and impermanence of young love, the love between a woman and an old flame, the friendship between two older women, the friendship between two men, one in the process of maturing and one who has emotional problems preventing him from fully maturing, the sadness of men going to war, and last but certainly not least, the beauties of nature which help to sustain all of the people in Willard. The book encompasses the whole village, past and present, and calls to mind those who helped to make it great. It's a story that has many positive elements. If you love God, country, and family, there isn't anything in this book which will turn you off It's very much like a little piece of Americana and will make you feel proud. If you don't like sexual scenes in your books, you'll have no worries with this one. There is nothing beyond kissing and not that much of this. I didn't long for the sexual love.. Sarton is so good at showing us love in all its forms without explicit sexual scenes that perhaps you won't feel deprived, either.

The book can have a melancholy feel to it. For instance, Christina and Cornelius are having some of their most peaceful and loving times but yet they know that their days are numbered. The single people are even more melancholy at times, living with just the memories of former partners. I can think of one single woman who seems to be the most well-adjusted of all. The young couple in love for the first time have the conflicts that so many young couples have. So this is a book about love that isn't all sweetness and light. The problems are definitely highlighted, but there is also a pervading joy especially in Cornelius' and Christina's home and in the outdoors where nature provides joy for so many. Once I got into this book it was a very cozy experience, and I seemed to look forward to getting back to it. I'll be 70 on my next birthday and so a book which focuses on elderly people is appropriate for me. Although there are younger people in the book, this is country living--some of them are retreating from busy lives and so there isn't a great deal of excitement--although there are certainly some nail-biting moments.

Samowar
Lengthy and quaint, but very insightful. An elderly couple retires to the small New Hampshire town that their family has vacationed in for generations. The relationship between them and the "locals" that they've always been friendly with is explored very well.

VAZGINO
A well told story

Prinna
I found this book in Volume 1 of the 1971 Reader's Digest Condensed Books, which I had stored for many years in my basement. Since I had enjoyed other books by May Sarton, I decided to keep this volume until I had read Kinds of Love. I was nearly halfway through when I discovered a note I had written in the margin. This note told me I had read the book for the first time about 25 years ago.
I don't remember finding typos or subject/verb disagreement in other books by this author, but I found one of each in this book. Perhaps those things were a result of the Reader's Digest Condensation, but I think Reader's Digest is generally very good with their editing.
The author is very good with her descriptions of places and people. I felt as if I knew the characters and would recognize them on the street.
The title of the book is appropriate since the author has written about many kinds of love in this book, e.g. love of parents for their children and later their grandchildren, love awakening in a teenage girl, love of neighbors, love of a town and its history, love of hard work, love of nature, rediscovered love of a couple for each other after being married for many years, and a first love that still has sparks after many years have past.

Dilkree
Charming and poignant story about an elderly couple, Cornelius and Christina Chapman, who have spent many "summer vacations" in the small town of Willard, New Hampshire, who now decide to stay full-time. Christina becomes close friends with a local woman, Ellen, and much of the novel is about their developing friendship (it's a rocky relationship, much like the terrain in which the book is set). Interspaced with the developing story are journal entries kept by Christina in which she steps back and evaluates situations occurring with Ellen, her husband, her family, and the world of Willard. Sarton is an excellent nature writer and her descriptions of rural Willard throughout the different seasons are excellent. Christina feels at the end of the book that by living permanently in Willard "I am close to my real feeling now," and that she and Cornelius have come into their own. A very appealing and uplifting story.

Sudert
I haven't read it yet.

Zeli
I got this book because of a good newspaper review. I did not like it at all.

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