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Books for Teens

Prized (Birthmarked) epub ebook

by Caragh M. O'Brien

Prized (Birthmarked) epub ebook

Author: Caragh M. O'Brien
Category: Literature & Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Square Fish; Reprint edition (September 4, 2012)
Pages: 400 pages
ISBN: 1250010314
ISBN13: 978-1250010315
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 743
Other formats: lit azw doc lrf


The second book in Caragh M. O’Brien’s Birthmarked trilogy, Prized was pretty good. Standard dystopian fare, once again, with a female as the lead character.

The second book in Caragh M. I am seeing an increasing amount of dystopian literature that revolves around exploitation of young females. Sometimes her innocence is as shocking as her world-weariness. But her innate, magnet-like draw to pregnant women and babies is her true core, and I'm glad to see it explored in more depth and layers in this book. O'Brien explores the depth of issues in the complicated web that is womanhood and motherhood, without it feeling like a treatise or lecture.

In memory of my father, Thomond R. O'Brien, Sr. Contents. Chapter 1 The Baby Quota 1. Chapter 2 A Small, Brown Parcel 9. Chapter 3 Rapunel 25. Chapter 4 The Folded Triangle 34. Chapter 5 Shepherd's Purse 50.

by Caragh M. O'Brien. The Birthmarked Trilogy: Birthmarked, Prized

by Caragh M. The Birthmarked Trilogy: Birthmarked, Prized. ore.

Birthmarked by Caragh M. O'Brien was probably the first series that I picked up after the hype of the Hunger Games. I'm glad I did! Birthmarked is about Gaia, a terrific female protagonist, who has a burn scar on her face, and thus, has been "unwanted" by the Enclave that she serves. I also love all the puzzles that are in the book, and how Gaia figures them out. Lastly, I think it's interesting how her burn serves as both protection and as a mark of shame at the same time. Overall, interesting characters, exciting plot, and O'Brien has marked herself as an author to watch. 7 people found this helpful.

Birthmarked by Caragh O'Brien. Macmillan: Full Excerpt for Birthmarked: Books: Caragh M. Birthmarked by Caragh O'Brien. IN THE ENCLAVE, those marked with a code will determine the future. 29 November 2011 ·. inthegoodbooks.

After defying the ruthless Enclave, surviving the wasteland, and overthrowing Sylum, Gaia Stone now faces her greatest challenge yet-to lead the people of Sylum back to the Enclave and persuade the Protectorat to grant them refuge. But in Gaia's absence, the Enclave has become even more ruthless, picking girls from outside the wall to serve in an experimental baby factory. This short story takes place during the time between the second book in the Birthmarked trilogy (Prized) and the final book (Promised) and offers a rare glimpse into the mind and heart of Leon Grey. 508. Published: 2012. O'Brien

by Caragh M. In it is hidden mercy. Fierce Reads: Kisses and Curses. But what about Leon? Now, in this new story that bridges the gap between Birthmarked and Prized, Caragh M. O’Brien answers her readers’ most common question with a tale of suffering and determination from Leon’s perspective. The sto. The Keep of Ages (The Vault of Dreamers, by Caragh M.

Read Prized online free from your Mobile, Tablet, P. .Prized is genre Young Adult novel by author Caragh M. Books by caragh M. Views 166. Published 2012. Birthmarked Caragh M. Views 254. Published 2011.

Authors: Caragh M. Books by same authors: Ruled.

Striking out into the wasteland with nothing but her baby sister, a handful of supplies, and a rumor to guide her, sixteen-year-old midwife Gaia Stone survives only to be captured by the people of Sylum, a dystopian society where women rule the men who drastically outnumber them, and a kiss is a crime. In order to see her sister again, Gaia must submit to their strict social code, but how can she deny her sense of justice, her curiosity, and everything in her heart that makes her whole?

Reviews (7)
Stonewing
The second book in Caragh M. O’Brien’s Birthmarked trilogy, Prized was pretty good. Standard dystopian fare, once again, with a female as the lead character. I am seeing an increasing amount of dystopian literature that revolves around exploitation of young females. (The Selection series, The Chemical Garden series, Uglies trilogy, Matched trilogy…) While I enjoy these books, I am concerned about this growing trend, and how it will affect young girls. But, I am getting ahead of myself a little here.

When last we saw Gaia, she had escaped from the Enclave with her newborn baby sister, Maya. After two weeks of traveling across the Waste Lands, the two sisters are starving and week. A man comes upon them and takes them to his community of Sylum. (There are lots of “our” words that have been hybridized for this book). Once in the community, Gaia discovers that the women are in charge, and dying off. Gaia has to relinquish her sister to the Matrarc (told you). Gaia manages to make herself useful to the community by being a midwife, but also manages to alienate herself by being headstrong and ignoring the laws. Add to that, an old familiar face shows up, and Gaia unexpectedly finds herself in a love square.

The book is interesting; there are some good plot points in the book. But, I would have to give it just a three out of five stars, and am not sure if I will read the third. The same ground seems to be covered over and over within this genre, and I find myself liking the genre less and less. I can no longer read dystopian literature back to back, like I could when I first discovered these books. But, that’s me.

Mave
My Review

Overall, my first impression is...up-and-down. I had some of my most enjoyable moments in the entire story in this book. And no, I don't just mean the Leon Grey/Quarry/Vlatir action. *wink*wink* not telling. There were some really beautiful moments between women, like several from Birthmarked, but unmarred by the questions of baby "advancement." Oh wait, no they weren't.

Sylum is nearly as restrictive as the Enclave, except that it is a matriarchal society ruled by, you guessed it, the Matrarch. But I'm getting ahead of myself. There were aspects of this story I loved, some which felt left unfulfilled, and some which just weren't a fit for me.

Loved

Leon. You have to love Leon. He's so irresistibly drawn to Gaia, even when it (and she) drives him nuts. He is allowed to grow from a reserved, damaged young man into a full-fledged, dirty, snarling, fighting heartthrob. Genius!

Gaia. When you are reminded that she's just sixteen, and that she's lost so much, your heart goes out to her. Sometimes her innocence is as shocking as her world-weariness. But her innate, magnet-like draw to pregnant women and babies is her true core, and I'm glad to see it explored in more depth and layers in this book. O'Brien explores the depth of issues in the complicated web that is womanhood and motherhood, without it feeling like a treatise or lecture. As a midwife, these complications are a natural part of Gaia's life. The thing about Gaia that is so interesting is that her convictions are so strong that she pushes herself to incredible feats of bravery or endurance in order to get someone to LISTEN to this little girl.

The Fading of the Scar. In Sylum, Gaia is desired, even with her scar. In fact, you often "forget" she has it in that no one reacts to it in the ways they did in Birthmarked. Of course, she benefits from a society that is extremely man-impoverished, but you never get the sense that THAT is why some of them like her. She's different, but in this book, finally, that difference is valued by those around her. And even better, that difference is not on the surface, it's within her.

Left Unfulfilled

Back to Leon. Ok (SPOILER ALERT!!!!) so in the last book she gave us a sweet kiss. Wonderful. And then he crossed the Wasteland and endured terrible hardships for her...and eventually, she for him. And O'Brien gave us a little lap make out session. Goosebumps. Adorable. Sweet. Delicious. Aaaaaaaaaand then Gaia pulled away again, mostly. Sigh. I would really have liked a little more of that. Just a little more.

Baby Sex Changes. She explained why people seized up and died when they tried to leave Sylum, and they sorta explained why the female children are changed to males, at least, externally. But they never really follow this up or discuss it further. I was kind of like WHAT???? All these poor people had their sexes changed in utero by hormones from the old fish farm and no one really delves into that again. But as a sci-fi girl, the mysteries of Sylum were a major part of my interest and this one was, sadly, unfulfilled.

Weren't a Fit for Me

These are nit-picks...or things that are not preferences for me. This was the "down" in my up and down with the story.

Peter. I enjoyed Peter. He was a ray of sunshine in a dark part of Gaia's world. He was clearly handsome and strong, and kind and sexy. Buuuuuuut. Gaia was also into his brother Will? And Leon? Of the four, I found Peter the least credible. Will's tendency toward medicine (and also described sexiness) made me think Gaia would more likely stir his heart. I get it that Peter is more impetuous, but their spark was too quick and unexplained for me really.

Going Back to the Enclave / Where the Heck is Everybody Else? Ok, (SPOILER ALE....oh, heck, the review has spoilers, all right?) so they are headed back to the Enclave, which O'Brien explains by saying that there is no place else that they know of to go...and like many dystopians I have a burning question. Where the Heck is Everybody Else? There are only groups numbering in the thousands left? Really? I proposed an apocalypse that wiped out over 99 percent of people and there are still a LOT left when you start with 7 billion. So anyhoo, being the sci-fi geek that I am, I'd just like to know why the Enclave and Sylum are the only places left. But maybe I just have to wait for book three for that...

Oh and by the way, I wanted to hate the matriarchal society, mostly because I often find them to rest on fallacies about women, such as, we are inherently better people than men. But I liked O'Brien's Sylum. I thought it was interesting, layered, and in some ways, well-explained. And in keeping with the story, it all rests on the fundamental and so far, inescapable truth, that women bear children.

In the end, I totally recommend this book to anyone who enjoyed Birthmarked, Gaia, or dystopians in general. This one is detailed, and well done. I am looking forward to book three.

Eyalanev
WOW! I love this series so much! Book two was fantastic! I was completely, fangirly obsessed with it, and I've already started book 3. Seeing the characters change and grow was captivating and gut-wrenching, and I liked that there were a lot of relationship hurdles and challenges. Honestly, there were a lot of challenges and struggles in all areas, and that always kept things interesting.

The new world (Sylum) was especially fascinating, and the laws and lifestyles of the people gave me a lot to think about.

It was my first experiences with a love square (that I can recall), and I thought that was both fun and heartbreaking to the extreme. It reminds me of how many people and moments there are in life. Sometimes we pass them up, and sometimes we let those people creep into the small places of our hearts, which can be really good, rather bad, and occasionally ugly.

Kanrad
Gaia once more finds herself in an oppressive government, being told what she should do and how she should behave. She's not liking it. As the strange rules and pressure mess with her head, she struggles to hold on to what she believes in. However, when push comes to shove, she steps up for justice. The author continues to create a tale of inequality and injustice. This book wasn't as good as first one, but I will continue on to book three in the hopes that it will improve. Gaia is a bit hard to be credible seeing as to how much havoc and authority she takes on when she's only 16.

Lcena
I almost didn't order this book because of all the negative ratings from the anti-abortionists. I am personally opposed to abortion but at the same time, feel it should be a personal decision, not a political one. The girl in the story did have some very good, unselfish reasons and did make the right choice in her circumstance. Enough on that - this book kept me interested and wanting to know more. I will order and start to read the next one immediately

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