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Books for Teens

Petals in the Ashes epub ebook

by Mary Hooper

Petals in the Ashes epub ebook

Author: Mary Hooper
Category: Literature & Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (July 5, 2004)
Pages: 192 pages
ISBN: 0747564612
ISBN13: 978-0747564614
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 683
Other formats: rtf mobi doc lrf


When I peered out of the curtains of our carriage there were no corpses slumped in the streets, no crosses on doors, no screams of those enclosed within foetid houses and no death carts conveying raddled bodies to the plague pits.

When I peered out of the curtains of our carriage there were no corpses slumped in the streets, no crosses on doors, no screams of those enclosed within foetid houses and no death carts conveying raddled bodies to the plague pits. There were just fields and farm animals and the occasional village, and the endless dusty road which threatened to jolt us to bits before we ever arrived at our destination.

Petals in the Ashes continues the story started in At the Sign of the Sugared Plum

Petals in the Ashes continues the story started in At the Sign of the Sugared Plum. Following the Black Death comes the great fire of London which destroys much of the town.

Petals in the Ashes book.

Walked thence and saw all the town burned, and a miserable sight of Paul’s church, with all the roofs fallen and the body of the quire falle. an, for the lethargy that had fallen on everyone had somewhat passed, and by then most of us were anxious to see what remained of London now that the fire was halted, and whether or not anything survived of our homes.

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I could barely explain how much I wanted to go back to London, for I hardly understood myself. I'd hated the stinking city when we'd left, could hardly bear to think on its name, but now the plague had disappeared from the streets the people would be back, the theatres and shops would be open and we would find everything as cheery as it had been before. Mary Hooper evokes with complete mastery the sights, sounds and terror of a London gripped by the ferocious and terrible Fire of London, engulfing everything in its path. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Mary Hooper began writing about twenty years ago, often short stories for women's and teen magazines. She now focuses solely on books. She is the author of Amy and At the Sign of the Sugared Plum. Mary lives in Eversley Cross, England. Библиографические данные.

Plague - England - London - History - 17th century - Juvenile fiction, Great Fire, London, England, 1666 - Juvenile fiction, Plague - England - Fiction, Great Fire, London, England, 1666 - Fiction, Sisters - Fiction, London (England) - History - 17th century - Fiction, Great Britain -. - History - Charles II, 1660-1685 - Fiction. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 8, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

As she did previously, Hooper laces her tale with vivid historical and physical detail: Hannah goes from . Readers not intimately acquainted with London's districts will be lost as Hooper traces the conflagration's course in exact detail.

As she did previously, Hooper laces her tale with vivid historical and physical detail: Hannah goes from quarantine in a revolting "pesthouse" to a stay in a great manor; then while reopening her confectionary, she catches glimpses of the king, and of the period's unruly theatrical scene. Meanwhile she's riding an emotional rollercoaster as her beau, Tom, turns out not to be dead as reported, but working with a sinister quack styled Count de'Ath. Unlike the story, the fire starts slowly-but both build in parallel to a roaring climax

The Fever and the Flame. It is a very quick and easy read, with questions at the end of the book to help the reader gain a better insight to the devastation that happened during that time period. At the sign of the Surgard Plum.

The Fever and the Flame. com User, February 23, 2008. com User, May 16, 2005. This was an AMAZING book!!!! I was surprised to hear about all of the things that happend during the plague, but it was fun to read about a girl close to my age that lived during it.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Children's Books. Mary Hooper has been writing professionally for over 20 years. She started by writing short stories and serials for teenage and women's magazines when her children were small. It is 1666: a year after Hannah, heroine of At the Sign of the Sugared Plum, first came to London and was forced to leave after the outbreak of plague. Having done a few hundred, and thinking it would be good to see something more permanent on the shelves, she wrote and had published 15 teenage novels.

I could barely explain how much I wanted to go back to London, for I hardly understood myself. I'd hated the stinking city when we'd left, could hardly bear to think on its name, but now the plague had disappeared from the streets the people would be back, the theatres and shops would be open and we would find everything as cheery as it had been before. Hannah returns to her beloved London to re-open the sweetmeats shop with younger sister Anne. Londoners are reeling from the plague epidemic of the previous year, but Hannah and Anne are keen to start enjoying everything the bustling city has to offer. But this is 1666, and it has been prophesised that terrible things will happen, and on Pudding Lane, flames are raging through the bakery... Mary Hooper evokes with complete mastery the sights, sounds and terror of a London gripped by the ferocious and terrible Fire of London, engulfing everything in its path.
Reviews (7)
Steel_Blade
Excellent descriptions of life in the mid 1600's London. You can tell a great deal of research went into writing this story. As far as character development, and depth, there wasn't much. The characters were pretty flat, with only a little growth, which was told about by the narrator, rather than shown through actions. The ending was also a bit pat and convenient. But the details were so good and the historical information so good, I really didn't seem to care.

Kriau
This book is a sequel to "At the Sign of the Sugared Plum." It follows Hannah and Sarah as they try and deliver an orphaned baby to its rich relatives during the plague. Rather than received with thanks, they are sent to a pesthouse for forty days. Afterward, they return to their home town where Sarah meets a new beau. Hannah and her younger sister Anne return to London and reopen their sweetmeats shop. Only after Hannah is reunited with her fiancé and business begins to pick up does the Great Fire of London ravage the city.

Overall, I thought this was a well written book. The characters were engaging and interesting. I thought the plot moved a bit slower than the first book and was not quite as smooth. However, I really enjoyed this book and plan on looking for more books written by Ms. Hooper.

Nalaylewe
Books were in good condition !

Anicasalar
Petals in the Ashes continues the story started in At the Sign of the Sugared Plum. Following the Black Death comes the great fire of London which destroys much of the town. Back are beloved characters and the story is neatly tied up. Perfect for seventh eighth grade girls or anyone wanting to learn more about Medieval England.

mr.Mine
This historical fiction about the great fire in London is a sequel to "At the Sign of the Sugared Plum." It is a good book for young readers 10-13 years old. I used these books for my 6th grade elective reading. It is a very quick and easy read, with questions at the end of the book to help the reader gain a better insight to the devastation that happened during that time period.

Ishnsius
I enjoyed this book. The only reason I didn't give it five stars is that some parts seemed rushed or not fully "fleshed out". I would read a third book in the series if she writes it.

Ndav
The sequel to AT THE SIGN OF THE SUGARED PLUM is just as good and carries on the wonderful adventure of Hannah as she grows up to learn different things in different enviroments. Just as thrilling as the first this will keep you guessing what's going to happen. If you want your teenage daughter to read give her this book and the one before. She'll love it and feel the same feelings as Hannah. Seeing as i'm a teenager i know what i'm talking about.

In this sequel to At the Sign of the Sugared Plum ([...] Hannah and her sister Sarah escape from quarantined London to Dorchester, bearing the orphaned child of a noble family who have died of the Bubonic Plague. They deliver the child to her relatives and,after a sojourn at a local house of pestilence, remain at the estate until the Plague begins abate in London. Eventually the quarantine lifts, and after visiting their country home in Chertsey, Hannah returns with her younger sister Anne to re-open their confectionary shop in London.

The city is a different place after the ravages of the Plague, and white crosses are visible on many empty homes and businesses. Hannah visits the shop of her sweetheart and learns from neighbors that he contracted the Plague and was taken to a burial pit. She grieves, and then is mystified when a local conjurer's assistant bears a strikingly resemblance to him. She follows him to Bartholomew Fair to discover that he has not in fact died. The budding romance are interrupted when fire breaks out, completely devastating the city.

The romantic story is a thin foil for the real action, which is the rebuilding of London and then the Great Fire. Hooper builds upon the excellent historical foundation she laid in the original book, giving a sense of the period's flavor by such scenes as the two sisters at confectionary-making and herb-gathering (recipes are included at the end of the book); the many sideshows at Bartholomew Fair (taken from historical accounts); and the detailed description of Hannah's journey through the burning city, with all the landmarks that succumb to the fire, is nothing short of breathtaking. As in the first book, excerpts from Pepys' diary ([...]) introduce each chapter.

The character development is again rather shallow and the love story leaves much to be desired. Hannah continues to be self-absorbed and shallow. Her beau never declares his intentions, but he gives her a keepsake locket and there are several romantic scenes that end in kissing. This sentimental indulgence in the context of an undefined pseudo-courtship makes the book feel more like a modern teenage novel than a story from this time period. Parents will have to judge for themselves whether the love story outweighs the historical benefit of this book. For our purposes, we will probably read it once as a supplement to our history education, but it won't make it to our recreational reading shelf.

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