» » An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions 1.27-71
hotellemcasadeicervia.it
ePub 1570 kb. | Fb2 1760 kb. | DJVU: 1348 kb.
Bibles

An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions 1.27-71 epub ebook

by F. Stanley Jones

An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions 1.27-71 epub ebook

Author: F. Stanley Jones
Category: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Society of Biblical Literature (June 1, 1995)
Pages: 208 pages
ISBN: 0788501186
ISBN13: 978-0788501180
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 285
Other formats: azw rtf lit doc


If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.

Title: An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions . 7-71 By: F. Stanley Jones Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 224 Vendor: Society of Biblical Literature Publication Date: 1995. Dimensions: . 0 X . 2 X . 9 (inches) Weight: 12 ounces ISBN: 0788504509 ISBN-13: 9780788504501 Stock No: WW504501. If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions . 7-71 (Society of Biblical Literature Texts and Translations; Christian Apocrypha Series). Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions . 222 Pages · 1995 · . 6 MB · 138 Downloads ·English. If you feel beautiful, then you are. Even if you don't, you still are. ― Terri Guillemets. sources of discovery and knowledge, requiring sophisticated analysis techniques that go far beyond. The Limits of Organic Life in Planetary Systems. 29 MB·28,172 Downloads·New!

Jones is not the first to speculate that Recognitions I:27-71 comes from an Ebionite source called the .

Jones is not the first to speculate that Recognitions I:27-71 comes from an Ebionite source called the Anabathmoi Jakobou. He sets out translations of the Latin, Armenian and Syriac versions of the texts (they differ slightly). However, this limited work by F. Stanley Jones dealing with a portion of the Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions book one (hereafter referred to as the PCR) challenged and superceeded the accepted wisdom regarding the structure and history of these forth century century Christian novels. Please have a good reason to read this book.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions . 7-71 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Details (if other): Cancel. An Ancient Jewish Christian Source on the History of Christianity: Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions . 7-71. by. F. Stanley Jones.

Jones's work is a revision of his 1989 Vanderbilt University P. dissertation directed by Gerd Ludemann, "Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions . 7-71: Early Jewish Christian Perspectives on the Nature and History of Christianity

Jones's work is a revision of his 1989 Vanderbilt University P. 7-71: Early Jewish Christian Perspectives on the Nature and History of Christianity. For this volume, Jones has updated the bibliography and added an English translation of the Latin version of Recognitions, putting his translation of the Syriac and Latin versions, with occasional Armenian fragments in translation, in parallel columns for ready comparison

Journal of Early Christian Studies The second contribution of this book is a 44 page chapter on the isolation of the source material.

Journal of Early Christian Studies. Journal of Early Christian Studies. Johns Hopkins University Press. The Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions and Homilies bear witness to an early Christian novel describing Clement of Rome’s conversion to Christian faith, his travels with St. Peter and his discovery of lost members of his family. The second contribution of this book is a 44 page chapter on the isolation of the source material.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 9% restored

Atlanta, G. Scholars Press, 1995. Recommend this journal.

Atlanta, G. Antonía Tripolitis (a1). Rutgers UniversityNew Brunswick, New Jersey.

Reviews (2)
great ant
There exists a collection of Pseudo-Clementine Literature (supposedly by Clement of Rome) that includes a historical romance called 'The Recognitions' and a collection of 'Homilies'. Neither of these texts is the 'original' Greek text. What Jones had done is theorise that part of the Recognitions imbeds a text from an early heretical group called the Ebionites.

The Ebionites are an obscure group. They were a Jewish-Christian group that recognised the messiahship of Jesus but not his divinity. They followed the Jewish law strictly. They considered Paul to be a renegade. It is unclear how large the Ebionites were. Their literature has disappeared and the only surviving information comes from Patristic Authors.

Jones is not the first to speculate that Recognitions I:27-71 comes from an Ebionite source called the Anabathmoi Jakobou. He sets out translations of the Latin, Armenian and Syriac versions of the texts (they differ slightly).

I was not fully convinced that it was possible to get any useful information from the section of the Recognitions derived from the lost Jewish-Christiam source and Jones would agree. The Recognitions is a work of fiction. It differs from the brief summary contained in the Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis. Jones concludes that previous scholars had overestimated the importance of the section from the Recognitions.

Unnis
Possibly the title of my review overstates the importance of this book in a rather arcane area of study. But if so, it does so only slightly. Prior to the publication of this book in 1995, the field was dominated more or less by the work of Georg Strecker from 1958. Strecker would go on to publish two more fine books on this literature including a very valuable concordance. Unfortunately, for the Anglophone reader, these books are only available in German. However, this limited work by F. Stanley Jones dealing with a portion of the Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions book one (hereafter referred to as the PCR) challenged and superceeded the accepted wisdom regarding the structure and history of these forth century century Christian novels. Please have a good reason to read this book. This is extremely heavy lifting. And, the extensive footnotes need careful consideration to fully maximize the value of the text. This originated as Jones' PhD dissertation in 1988. But, in this case that is deceiving, Jones receive a DD from Gottingen University in German in prior years and taught at that university and one other prior to his return to the United States. His first scholarly article was published in 1982 and his first book in German in 1988. This is the work of a fully mature scholar who has since become the world's greatest expert in this area of study. A torrent of other scholarship has followed including a dozen or so articles and a number of books from Jones as well as close to one hundred and forty books and articles by others. This scholarly outpouring has generally accepted Jones' interpretations and conclusions as reflected in this book with one exception I can think of who would be Robert H. Eisenman. Eisenman's thoughts on the Pseudo-Clementines hold no sway in the current discourse, but in fairness I thought I should acknowledge it.

In particular the text concerned is a section of the PCR form 1:27 to 71. It should be noted that these are book one and chapters 27-71. This particular material has created problems for scholars of this material from Toland through Bauer and into the present. The author traces this scholarship from Higenfield in 1848 until the publication of this book in 1995. This is a meticulous survey of all the major secondary sources. Each of the works considered is critically engaged by Jones in detail. This analysis sets the stage for the author's highly revisionist history of the above mentioned passage. Next, the reader is provided with a short but highly informative discussion of the Latin and Syriac recensions of this material as well as the Armenian fragments thereof. Jones concludes that both are of about equal value to the scholar and that one should not be favored over the other. Supporting this is a parallel translation of both and the fragments which occupies a large section of this work. All the translations are new and by the author. The translation of the Syriac into English of this portion is unique. Prior to this none of the PCR had ever been translated into a modern language. Without these translations the rest of the author's analysis of this passage would be meaningless to the reader. The translations themselves are easily understandable and the differences, and omissions between the two recensions are obvious to the reader from their arrangement in parallel. There is a great deal of nearly identical material in the two translations of the passage. This supports the author's contention that both were good faith efforts at a reasonably accurate rendering from the Greek and also his contention that they are of equal value to the scholar. In essence, these chapters are preliminary to Jones' critical insights into this section of the PCR.

The next section of the book is titled, "Isolation of the Source Material." However, it is much more that just this. This passage is put into the context of the rest of the Pseudo-Clementines and then the author attempts to reconstruct the underlying original passage. First the passage is subject to source criticism followed by redaction criticism, and then the relationship of the Recognitionist (R) to the Basic Writer (BW) who is responsible for the early version of the entire PCR. Who came first and who modified the other's work? Jones argues persuasively that R's writing is primary and that the work of the of BW came later. The author finds that R was dependent on the work of Hegesippus which dates the work to circa 173 to 200 CE This dependence is well argued and a departure from prior scholarship. With BW working around 220 CE, this delimits the time frame in which the passage under consideration was written. Notable changes introduced by BW include a major interpolation in the middle of the passage as well as a major reworking of the death of James the relative of Jesus. R places the incident in the mid to late thirties CE with Paul as the causative agent. BW changes this to James being injured at that time and his death being later and attributed to Ananus ben Ananus in 62 CE. Important background sources for R include, Genesis and the Jubilees as well as Matthew, Luke, the Acts of the Apostles, and the gospel of the Ebionites. In no way does R rubber stamp the content of these sources but bends them to his own thinking. R seems particularly annoyed by Acts of the Apostles and is intent on a reinterpretation of that Early Christian History. Nothing indicates that R used or was acquainted with the Pauline corpus. It is also quite possible that originally this material was issued under the name of Matthew only to be replaced by the BW who makes Peter the narrator. So what we have here is an extremely early Jewish Christian document that tells quite a bit about that branch of the faith approaching the beginning of the third century CE.

So what are we left with? R sees Christianity as the religion originally intended by Moses. Christianity is the true Judaism. R has great concern for the land of Judaea which may place him there rather than the Decapolis and, he never mentions the Pella tradition. He is a Jewish Christian as opposed to a Christian Jew. Baptism into Jesus Christ is essential. He is the salvational path to an afterlife. Jesus Christ came to obviate the need for sacrifice and he did so. Jesus Christ will have a second coming. The millennial Kingdom is proclaimed. Sacrifice and the Temple cult are abhorrent to R. The gentiles are welcomed into the congregation and will be needed to make up the "number" because the obstinate Jews did not believe. No mention of circumcision is to be found. Quite amazingly, Astrology is seen as a useful guide to finding God. James the relative of Jesus is the ideal while Paul is the enemy of this group. This takes most of us into a religion that many of us quite unfamiliar with. There is much more here that bears on the nature of early eastern Jewish Christianity. This would be a logical starting point for any pursuit of this branch of Jewish Christianity. If you are able to deal with the critical methodologies employed, I recommend this book most highly. Jones is a lucid writer and has made this material as accessible as possible within the context of what he wished to accomplish. However, this is not narrative history. It is intellectually challenging but extremely rewarding. Once read, the reader may find his curiosity peaked. And, there is a great deal of scholarship that follows up on this most signal achievement.

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved